Culminate was first used in English in the 17th century in the field of astronomy. When a star or other heavenly body culminates, it reaches the point at which it is highest above the horizon from the

Word of the Day: Culminate

Culminate was first used in English in the 17th century in the field of astronomy. When a star or other heavenly body culminates, it reaches the point at which it is highest above the horizon from the

Vol plané (meaning 'gliding flight') was a phrase used by 19th-century French ornithologists to describe downward flight by birds; it contrasted with vol à voile ('soaring flight'). Around the time

Word of the Day: Volplane

Vol plané (meaning 'gliding flight') was a phrase used by 19th-century French ornithologists to describe downward flight by birds; it contrasted with vol à voile ('soaring flight'). Around the time

Turpitude came to English from Latin turpitudo by way of Middle French. Turpitudo comes from turpis, which means 'vile' or 'base.' Turpitude is often found in the phrase 'moral turpitude,' an

Word of the Day: Turpitude

Turpitude came to English from Latin turpitudo by way of Middle French. Turpitudo comes from turpis, which means 'vile' or 'base.' Turpitude is often found in the phrase 'moral turpitude,' an

You can have faith in fidelity, which has existed in English since the 15th century; its etymological path winds back through Middle English and Middle French, eventually arriving at the Latin verb

Word of the Day: Fidelity

You can have faith in fidelity, which has existed in English since the 15th century; its etymological path winds back through Middle English and Middle French, eventually arriving at the Latin verb

650 Likes, 14 Comments - Merriam-Webster (@merriamwebster) on Instagram: “The #wordoftheday is moue. #merriamwebster #dictionary #language”

650 Likes, 14 Comments - Merriam-Webster (@merriamwebster) on Instagram: “The #wordoftheday is moue. #merriamwebster #dictionary #language”

Pedantic | Definition of Pedantic by Merriam-Webster

Pedantic | Definition of Pedantic by Merriam-Webster

18 Likes, 1 Comments - Merriam-Webster (@merriamwebster) on Instagram: "Obnubilate" means "to becloud or obscure". #WordOfTheDay #words #wordnerd #dictionary

18 Likes, 1 Comments - Merriam-Webster (@merriamwebster) on Instagram: "Obnubilate" means "to becloud or obscure". #WordOfTheDay #words #wordnerd #dictionary

Argy-bargy and its slightly older variant argle-bargle have been a part of British English since the second half of the 19th century. Argy and argle evolved in certain English and Scottish dialects as

Word of the Day: Argy-bargy

Argy-bargy and its slightly older variant argle-bargle have been a part of British English since the second half of the 19th century. Argy and argle evolved in certain English and Scottish dialects as

Alien, alienable, inalienable—it's easy enough to see the Latin word alius, meaning 'other,' at the root of these three words. Alien joined our language in the 14th century, and one of its earliest

Word of the Day: Inalienable

Alien, alienable, inalienable—it's easy enough to see the Latin word alius, meaning 'other,' at the root of these three words. Alien joined our language in the 14th century, and one of its earliest

Here's a serious word, just for fun. That is to say, it means 'fun,' but it was created in all seriousness around 1940 by psychologists. They wanted a term to describe what children do, and they came

Word of the Day: Ludic

Here's a serious word, just for fun. That is to say, it means 'fun,' but it was created in all seriousness around 1940 by psychologists. They wanted a term to describe what children do, and they came

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