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Early on, the roles that Blacks portrayed in any form of media was the "mammy" "uncle tom" "buck" "wench/jezebel" "mulatto" or "pickaninny" Sometimes, most times, blacks weren't even cast by blacks. They had whites in blackface portray Blacks on stage.   http://black-face.com/

Early on, the roles that Blacks portrayed in any form of media was the "mammy" "uncle tom" "buck" "wench/jezebel" "mulatto" or "pickaninny" Sometimes, most times, blacks weren't even cast by blacks. They had whites in blackface portray Blacks on stage. http://black-face.com/

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The Early Minstrel Show [CD], 06066970

The Early Minstrel Show [CD], 06066970

You are viewing a picture portraying a  		Minstrel. This is a lithograph advertising the William West Minstrel  		Show. The Lithograph was created in 1900, by the Strobridge Lithograph  		Company. Minstrel shows involved white men painting their faces black,  		and then putting on a show.  The shows typically portrayed blacks  		as ignorant and of low class. The Minstrel show provided entertainment  		at the expense of African Americans.

You are viewing a picture portraying a Minstrel. This is a lithograph advertising the William West Minstrel Show. The Lithograph was created in 1900, by the Strobridge Lithograph Company. Minstrel shows involved white men painting their faces black, and then putting on a show. The shows typically portrayed blacks as ignorant and of low class. The Minstrel show provided entertainment at the expense of African Americans.

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Detail from cover of The Celebrated Negro Melodies, as Sung by the Virginia Minstrels, 1843
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Another Black and White Minstrel Show [CD], 23175709

Another Black and White Minstrel Show [CD], 23175709

Don't get what's wrong with blackface? Here's why it's so offensive. - Its American origins can be traced to minstrel shows. In the mid to late nineteenth century, white actors would routinely use black grease paint on their faces when depicting plantation slaves and free blacks on stage.

Don't get what's wrong with blackface? Here's why it's so offensive. - Its American origins can be traced to minstrel shows. In the mid to late nineteenth century, white actors would routinely use black grease paint on their faces when depicting plantation slaves and free blacks on stage.

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1896 Black Paper Dolls of Minstrel Show from Boston Globe Very RARE | eBay
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This image depicts a black caricature, or an an image that paints African Americans as strange. The video below is a satire animated cartoon on the history of gun violence and racism in the  United States, from Michael Moore’s documentary “Bowling For Columbine.” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jJyKTilOQXA&list=FLv1sloFwrjDa1Zly2eDiRVw

This image depicts a black caricature, or an an image that paints African Americans as strange. The video below is a satire animated cartoon on the history of gun violence and racism in the United States, from Michael Moore’s documentary “Bowling For Columbine.” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jJyKTilOQXA&list=FLv1sloFwrjDa1Zly2eDiRVw

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March 19, 1894 Loretta Mary Aiken (Jackie “Moms” Mabley), stand-up comedienne, was born in Brevard, North Carolina.  At the age of 15, Mabley ran away to Cleveland, Ohio with a travelling minstrel show where she began singing and entertaining.By the 1950s, she was one of the top women doing stand-up and earning $10,000 per week at the Apollo Theater.

March 19, 1894 Loretta Mary Aiken (Jackie “Moms” Mabley), stand-up comedienne, was born in Brevard, North Carolina. At the age of 15, Mabley ran away to Cleveland, Ohio with a travelling minstrel show where she began singing and entertaining.By the 1950s, she was one of the top women doing stand-up and earning $10,000 per week at the Apollo Theater.

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