The Sun in extreme ultraviolet light, as seen by the SDO observatory in February, 2014.

The Sun in extreme ultraviolet light, as seen by the SDO observatory in February, 2014.

nasa The sun produces energy by fusing hydrogen in its core, so the layers surrounding the core generally get cooler as you move outwards—with one exception. This filament on the sun, a giant ribbon of relatively cool solar material, threads through the corona, the sun's atmosphere. The individual threads that make up the filament are clearly discernible in this photo. This image, captured by the Solar Optical Telescope onboard JAXA/NASA’s Hinode solar observatory, has made a significant…

nasa The sun produces energy by fusing hydrogen in its core, so the layers surrounding the core generally get cooler as you move outwards—with one exception. This filament on the sun, a giant ribbon of relatively cool solar material, threads through the corona, the sun's atmosphere. The individual threads that make up the filament are clearly discernible in this photo. This image, captured by the Solar Optical Telescope onboard JAXA/NASA’s Hinode solar observatory, has made a significant…

“Now, for the first time, a computer simulation — so detailed it took a full year to run — shows how spicules form, helping scientists understand how spicules can break free of the sun’s surface and surge upward so quickly.”

Scientists Uncover Origins of Sun’s Swirling Spicules

“Now, for the first time, a computer simulation — so detailed it took a full year to run — shows how spicules form, helping scientists understand how spicules can break free of the sun’s surface and surge upward so quickly.”

Apollo 13 mission patch - "Houston, we have a problem"  Astronauts James A. Lovell, Jr., Fred W. Haise, Jr., and John L. Swigert, Jr. launched on April 11, 1970.

Apollo 13

Apollo 13 mission patch - "Houston, we have a problem" Astronauts James A. Lovell, Jr., Fred W. Haise, Jr., and John L. Swigert, Jr. launched on April 11, 1970.

Use the first few pages only - This NASA storybook for children tells the story of the sun. The easy-to-understand text and graphics make it a useful classroom tool for younger students.

Use the first few pages only - This NASA storybook for children tells the story of the sun. The easy-to-understand text and graphics make it a useful classroom tool for younger students.

Image JA8209 (Solar Eruptions) A suite of NASA's sun-gazing spacecraft have spotted an unusual series of eruptions in which a series of fast puffs forced the slow ejection of a massive burst of #solar material from the sun's atmosphere. The sun's outermost atmosphere, the #corona, is made of magnetized solar material, called plasma, that has a temperature of millions of degrees and extends millions of miles into #space. ©NASA/Science Source #nasa #sun

JA8209: Solar Eruptions

Image JA8209 (Solar Eruptions) A suite of NASA's sun-gazing spacecraft have spotted an unusual series of eruptions in which a series of fast puffs forced the slow ejection of a massive burst of #solar material from the sun's atmosphere. The sun's outermost atmosphere, the #corona, is made of magnetized solar material, called plasma, that has a temperature of millions of degrees and extends millions of miles into #space. ©NASA/Science Source #nasa #sun

Sequence of Juno Spacecraft's Close Approach to Jupiter | NASA

Sequence of Juno Spacecraft's Close Approach to Jupiter

Sequence of Juno Spacecraft's Close Approach to Jupiter | NASA

nasa We're working to understand why up to 10 million jets of solar material burst from the sun’s surface at any moment. Called spicules, they can erupt as fast as 60 miles per second and reach lengths of 6,000 miles before collapsing. Now, for the first time, a computer simulation — so detailed it took a full year to run — shows how spicules form, helping scientists understand how they break free of the sun’s surface and surge upward so quickly. Observing spicules has been a thorny problem…

nasa We're working to understand why up to 10 million jets of solar material burst from the sun’s surface at any moment. Called spicules, they can erupt as fast as 60 miles per second and reach lengths of 6,000 miles before collapsing. Now, for the first time, a computer simulation — so detailed it took a full year to run — shows how spicules form, helping scientists understand how they break free of the sun’s surface and surge upward so quickly. Observing spicules has been a thorny problem…

This web site is great for games, art & stories, and activities. Being that it comes from NASA the student will be able to engage in many activities. As a teacher there are many ideas that you can find for science in your classroom. 5380

This web site is great for games, art & stories, and activities. Being that it comes from NASA the student will be able to engage in many activities. As a teacher there are many ideas that you can find for science in your classroom. 5380

This image taken by the Solar Dynamics Observatorys Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument at 171 Angstrom shows the current conditions of the quiet corona and upper transition region of the Sun.

Sun's Quiet Corona

This image taken by the Solar Dynamics Observatorys Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument at 171 Angstrom shows the current conditions of the quiet corona and upper transition region of the Sun.

Every night you and your bed unknowingly travel 858,240 km around the Sun and 6,256,000 km around the center of the Milky Way.  Sweet dreams.

Every night you and your bed unknowingly travel 858,240 km around the Sun and 6,256,000 km around the center of the Milky Way. Sweet dreams.

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