Alice Paul, suffragist, founder of the National Woman's Party, and author of the Equal Rights Amendment

Alice Paul, suffragist, founder of the National Woman's Party, and author of the Equal Rights Amendment

Prominent young girls of Seneca Falls as warriors in honor of the officers and members of the National Woman's party 1923

Prominent young girls of Seneca Falls as warriors in honor of the officers and members of the National Woman's party 1923

Photographs from the Records of the  National Woman's Party (representing the militant wing of the suffrage movement) utilized public demonstrations (picketing, pageants, parades, demonstrations) to gain popular attention for the right of women to vote.

Photographs from the Records of the National Woman's Party (representing the militant wing of the suffrage movement) utilized public demonstrations (picketing, pageants, parades, demonstrations) to gain popular attention for the right of women to vote.

"Jailed for Freedom" pin that was awarded to all women who were jailed for picketing the White House by the National Woman's Party

"Jailed for Freedom" pin that was awarded to all women who were jailed for picketing the White House by the National Woman's Party

This ribbon was issued by Alice Paul's National Woman's Party, the group that picketed the White House.  The colors of purple, white, and yellow were so clearly identified with Paul's group that no written identification on the ribbon was deemed necessary.

This ribbon was issued by Alice Paul's National Woman's Party, the group that picketed the White House. The colors of purple, white, and yellow were so clearly identified with Paul's group that no written identification on the ribbon was deemed necessary.

Bastille Day spells prison for sixteen suffragettes who picketed the White House. Miss Julia Hurlbut of Morristown, New Jersey, leading the sixteen members of the National Woman's Party who participated in the picketing demonstration in front of the White House, Washington, District of Columbia, July 14,1917, which led to their arrest. These sixteen women were sent to the workhouse at Occoquan, on July 17, 1917, upon their refusal to pay fines, but were pardoned on July 19, 1917.

Bastille Day spells prison for sixteen suffragettes who picketed the White House. Miss Julia Hurlbut of Morristown, New Jersey, leading the sixteen members of the National Woman's Party who participated in the picketing demonstration in front of the White House, Washington, District of Columbia, July 14,1917, which led to their arrest. These sixteen women were sent to the workhouse at Occoquan, on July 17, 1917, upon their refusal to pay fines, but were pardoned on July 19, 1917.

The National Woman’s Party And the Meaning Behind Their Purple, White, and Gold Textiles | National Woman's Party

The National Woman’s Party And the Meaning Behind Their Purple, White, and Gold Textiles | National Woman's Party

Alice Paul's National Woman's Party pin in the organization's colors of purple, yellow, and white.

Alice Paul's National Woman's Party pin in the organization's colors of purple, yellow, and white.

National Woman's Party suffrage banner // Voter registration deadline here in Oregon is tomorrow, October 16 -- register at http://www.oregonvotes.org/pages/voterresources/regtovote/index.html

National Woman's Party suffrage banner // Voter registration deadline here in Oregon is tomorrow, October 16 -- register at http://www.oregonvotes.org/pages/voterresources/regtovote/index.html

Alice Paul unfurling the ratification banner over the railing of the National Woman's Party headquarters on August 26, 1920 -- the day the 19th Amendment was ratified. The banner was one of the most important to the NWP. For every state that ratified suffrage, the members sewed on a star. When Tennessee ratified the amendment, the final star was sewn on. [Courtesy of the National Woman's Party]

Alice Paul unfurling the ratification banner over the railing of the National Woman's Party headquarters on August 26, 1920 -- the day the 19th Amendment was ratified. The banner was one of the most important to the NWP. For every state that ratified suffrage, the members sewed on a star. When Tennessee ratified the amendment, the final star was sewn on. [Courtesy of the National Woman's Party]

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