Noma disease strikes when natural immunity …

Malnutrition brings a terrible disease to children in Niger

Combination of Food Supplements Distribution and Cash Transfer Help Reduce Child Malnutrition Rates in Niger

Combination of Food Supplements Distribution and Cash Transfer Help Reduce Child Malnutrition Rates in Niger

Cancrum Oris, commonly called Noma, is gangrene of the face, and for some reason it seems to hit kids more often than adults. More than 80% of those affected by the disease die, as it eats away at the tissue and musculature around their jaws. It’s an opportunistic infection that likes to hop on board in situations where people are malnourished, have unclean drinking water, poor dental hygiene, and live in close proximity to farm animals.

Cancrum Oris, commonly called Noma, is gangrene of the face, and for some reason it seems to hit kids more often than adults. More than 80% of those affected by the disease die, as it eats away at the tissue and musculature around their jaws. It’s an opportunistic infection that likes to hop on board in situations where people are malnourished, have unclean drinking water, poor dental hygiene, and live in close proximity to farm animals.

Facing Africa currently funds two teams of highly skilled and experienced volunteer surgeons from the UK, Germany, France and Holland to Ethiopia each year to perform complex facial reconstructive surgery on the victims of the disease noma. Each surgical mission spends 2 weeks in Ethiopia and genera...

Facing Africa currently funds two teams of highly skilled and experienced volunteer surgeons from the UK, Germany, France and Holland to Ethiopia each year to perform complex facial reconstructive surgery on the victims of the disease noma. Each surgical mission spends 2 weeks in Ethiopia and genera...

Six-year-old Zayyanu Murtala recovers from surgery to reconstruct a hole in his jaw and damage to his eye, caused by the flesh-eating disease known as ‘noma’, at MSF’s children’s hospital in Sokoto, northwest Nigeria. Coming from the Greek word for ‘to devour’, noma begins as an ulcer inside the mouth, which then eats away at the cheek tissue and bones in the mouth area of the infected person. Left untreated, the disease is fatal in up to 90 percent of cases. However, if treated early, the…

Six-year-old Zayyanu Murtala recovers from surgery to reconstruct a hole in his jaw and damage to his eye, caused by the flesh-eating disease known as ‘noma’, at MSF’s children’s hospital in Sokoto, northwest Nigeria. Coming from the Greek word for ‘to devour’, noma begins as an ulcer inside the mouth, which then eats away at the cheek tissue and bones in the mouth area of the infected person. Left untreated, the disease is fatal in up to 90 percent of cases. However, if treated early, the…

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