#Okapi by rccphoto, via Flickr Even though they look a lot like Zebras they are actually related to the Giraffe

#Okapi by rccphoto, via Flickr Even though they look a lot like Zebras they are actually related to the Giraffe

Brookfield Zoo, in Chicago, Illinois, is excited to share photos of ‘Will’, a male Okapi born at the zoo on April 21. Born to first-time mom, ‘Augusta K.’, Will is currently behind the scenes, but he can be seen via a live video feed that is set up in the zoo’s “Habitat Africa! The Forest”. Check out ZooBorns to learn more and see more! http://www.zooborns.com/zooborns/2015/05/brookfield-zoo-shares-photos-of-newest-okapi.html

Brookfield Zoo, in Chicago, Illinois, is excited to share photos of ‘Will’, a male Okapi born at the zoo on April 21. Born to first-time mom, ‘Augusta K.’, Will is currently behind the scenes, but he can be seen via a live video feed that is set up in the zoo’s “Habitat Africa! The Forest”. Check out ZooBorns to learn more and see more! http://www.zooborns.com/zooborns/2015/05/brookfield-zoo-shares-photos-of-newest-okapi.html

The okapi’s dark tongue is long enough to reach its eyes & ears. #WorldOkapiDay (photo: Mike Wilson)

The okapi’s dark tongue is long enough to reach its eyes & ears. #WorldOkapiDay (photo: Mike Wilson)

OKAPI  Okapia johnstoni  ©Steve J O’Brien. The okapi is a giraffid artiodactyl mammal native to the Ituri Rainforest. It is most closely related to the giraffe.    The body shape is similar to that of the giraffe, except that okapis have much shorter necks. Both species have very long (approximately 35 centimetres),  flexible, blue tongues that they use to strip leaves and buds from trees. Forget geckos - the okapi tongue is long enough to wash its eyelids and clean its ears (inside and…

OKAPI Okapia johnstoni ©Steve J O’Brien. The okapi is a giraffid artiodactyl mammal native to the Ituri Rainforest. It is most closely related to the giraffe. The body shape is similar to that of the giraffe, except that okapis have much shorter necks. Both species have very long (approximately 35 centimetres), flexible, blue tongues that they use to strip leaves and buds from trees. Forget geckos - the okapi tongue is long enough to wash its eyelids and clean its ears (inside and…

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