The Glagolitic alphabet was invented during the 9th century by the missionaries St Cyril (827-869 AD) and St Methodius (826-885 AD) in order to translate the Bible and other religious works into the language of the Great Moravia region. They probably modelled Glagolitic on a cursive form of the Greek alphabet, and based their translations on a Slavic dialect of the Thessalonika area, which formed the basis of the literary standard known as Old Church Slavonic.

The Glagolitic alphabet was invented during the 9th century by the missionaries St Cyril (827-869 AD) and St Methodius (826-885 AD) in order to translate the Bible and other religious works into the language of the Great Moravia region. They probably modelled Glagolitic on a cursive form of the Greek alphabet, and based their translations on a Slavic dialect of the Thessalonika area, which formed the basis of the literary standard known as Old Church Slavonic.

Old Church Slavonic: An Elementary Grammar

Old Church Slavonic: An Elementary Grammar

Semargl or Simargl (Old Church Slavonic: Семарьглъ, Симарьглъ) is a deity or mythical creature in East Slavic mythology. An idol of Semargl was present in the pantheon of Great Prince Vladimir I of Kiev. It may be the equivalent of Simurgh in Persian mythology who is also represented like a griffin with a dog body.

Semargl or Simargl (Old Church Slavonic: Семарьглъ, Симарьглъ) is a deity or mythical creature in East Slavic mythology. An idol of Semargl was present in the pantheon of Great Prince Vladimir I of Kiev. It may be the equivalent of Simurgh in Persian mythology who is also represented like a griffin with a dog body.

Cyrillic script is used to write more than 50 different languages. (Image from "Omniglot.com - writing systems and languages of the world")

Cyrillic script is used to write more than 50 different languages. (Image from "Omniglot.com - writing systems and languages of the world")

Stefan Nemanja (Old Church Slavonic: Стѣфань, Serbian: Стефан Немања, pronounced [stefan nemaɲa]  ; ca 1113 – 13 February 1199) was the Grand Prince (Veliki Župan) of the Serbian Grand Principality (Rascia) from 1166 to 1196. He was an heir of the Vukanović dynasty and was the founder of the Nemanjić dynasty. Photo: The fresco of Saint Simeon (Stefan Nemanja), King's Church in Studenica monastery.

Stefan Nemanja (Old Church Slavonic: Стѣфань, Serbian: Стефан Немања, pronounced [stefan nemaɲa] ; ca 1113 – 13 February 1199) was the Grand Prince (Veliki Župan) of the Serbian Grand Principality (Rascia) from 1166 to 1196. He was an heir of the Vukanović dynasty and was the founder of the Nemanjić dynasty. Photo: The fresco of Saint Simeon (Stefan Nemanja), King's Church in Studenica monastery.

Old Church Slavonic (словѣньскъ) or Church Slavonic is a literary language which developed from the language used by St Cyril and St Methodius, 9th century missionaries from Byzantium, to translate the bible and other religious works. Cyril and Methodius based their translations on a Slavonic dialect of the Thessalonika area and invented a new alphabet, Glagolitic, in order to write them. (...)

Old Church Slavonic (словѣньскъ) or Church Slavonic is a literary language which developed from the language used by St Cyril and St Methodius, 9th century missionaries from Byzantium, to translate the bible and other religious works. Cyril and Methodius based their translations on a Slavonic dialect of the Thessalonika area and invented a new alphabet, Glagolitic, in order to write them. (...)

Old Church Slavonic - Wikipedia

Old Church Slavonic - Wikipedia

The Glagolitic alphabet was invented during the 9th century by the missionaries St Cyril (827-869 AD) and St Methodius (826-885 AD) in order to translate the Bible and other religious works into the language of the Great Moravia region. They probably modelled Glagolitic on a cursive form of the Greek alphabet, and based their translations on a Slavic dialect of the Thessalonika area, which formed the basis of the literary standard known as Old Church Slavonic.

The Glagolitic alphabet was invented during the 9th century by the missionaries St Cyril (827-869 AD) and St Methodius (826-885 AD) in order to translate the Bible and other religious works into the language of the Great Moravia region. They probably modelled Glagolitic on a cursive form of the Greek alphabet, and based their translations on a Slavic dialect of the Thessalonika area, which formed the basis of the literary standard known as Old Church Slavonic.

The old Church Slavonic style

The old Church Slavonic style

November 27 / December 10 - Icon of the Most Holy Theotokos named ''Znamenie''

November 27 / December 10 - Icon of the Most Holy Theotokos named ''Znamenie''

Old Church Slavonic language (alphabet & language created by Saints/brothers Cyril & Methodius, c. 863) from the Flowery Triod (Triod' cvetnaja), 1491 (artists:  Sveboldus Fiol & Jan Turzon ~ Krakow).  One of the oldest printed Byzantine-Slavonic books since there had been no prior alphabet for that region.

Old Church Slavonic language (alphabet & language created by Saints/brothers Cyril & Methodius, c. 863) from the Flowery Triod (Triod' cvetnaja), 1491 (artists: Sveboldus Fiol & Jan Turzon ~ Krakow). One of the oldest printed Byzantine-Slavonic books since there had been no prior alphabet for that region.

The Primary Chronicle (Old Church Slavonic: Повѣсть времяньныхъ лѣтъ, Latin transliteration Povest' Vremyan'nykh Let' , often translated into English as Tale of Bygone Years) is a history of Kievan Rus' from about 850 to 1110, originally compiled in Kiev about 1113. The work is considered to be a fundamental source in the interpretation of the history of the Eastern Slavs.

The Primary Chronicle (Old Church Slavonic: Повѣсть времяньныхъ лѣтъ, Latin transliteration Povest' Vremyan'nykh Let' , often translated into English as Tale of Bygone Years) is a history of Kievan Rus' from about 850 to 1110, originally compiled in Kiev about 1113. The work is considered to be a fundamental source in the interpretation of the history of the Eastern Slavs.

Old Church Slavonic, Assemanus Gospel, 10th-11th c.

Old Church Slavonic, Assemanus Gospel, 10th-11th c.

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