Athene receives the head of Medousa from Perseus. The hero is depicted as a young man, wearing the winged boots of Hermes and the cap of darkness on his head. Athene holds the Gorgoneion (Gorgon head) by its snaky locks, its image reflecting in the mirror of the shield.  ca 400 - 385 BC

Athene receives the head of Medousa from Perseus. The hero is depicted as a young man, wearing the winged boots of Hermes and the cap of darkness on his head. Athene holds the Gorgoneion (Gorgon head) by its snaky locks, its image reflecting in the mirror of the shield. ca 400 - 385 BC

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CARAVAGGIO. One of my favorites that we learned about in art history. He's…
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(Ancient Greek: Πήγασος, Pégasos, Latin Pegasus) one of the best known mythological creatures in Greek mythology. He is a winged divine horse, usually depicted as white in colour. He was sired by Poseidon, in his role as horse-god, and foaled by the Gorgon Medusa. He was the brother of Chrysaor, born at a single birthing when his mother was decapitated by Perseus. Greco-Roman poets write about his ascent to heaven after his birth and his obeisance to Zeus, king of the gods.

(Ancient Greek: Πήγασος, Pégasos, Latin Pegasus) one of the best known mythological creatures in Greek mythology. He is a winged divine horse, usually depicted as white in colour. He was sired by Poseidon, in his role as horse-god, and foaled by the Gorgon Medusa. He was the brother of Chrysaor, born at a single birthing when his mother was decapitated by Perseus. Greco-Roman poets write about his ascent to heaven after his birth and his obeisance to Zeus, king of the gods.

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The Cap of Invisibility has appeared in Greek myth: Hades was ascribed possession of a cap or helmet that made the wearer invisible. In some versions of the Perseus myth, Perseus borrows this cap from the goddess Athena and uses it to sneak up on the sleeping Medusa when he kills her.  A similar helmet, the Tarnhelm, is found in Norse mythology. In the Second Branch of the Mabinogi, one of the important texts of Welsh mythology, Caswallawn (the historical Cassivellaunus)

The Cap of Invisibility has appeared in Greek myth: Hades was ascribed possession of a cap or helmet that made the wearer invisible. In some versions of the Perseus myth, Perseus borrows this cap from the goddess Athena and uses it to sneak up on the sleeping Medusa when he kills her. A similar helmet, the Tarnhelm, is found in Norse mythology. In the Second Branch of the Mabinogi, one of the important texts of Welsh mythology, Caswallawn (the historical Cassivellaunus)

These are the constellations of Cassiopeia, Pegasus and Perseus.

These are the constellations of Cassiopeia, Pegasus and Perseus.

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