The Picti or ‘painted ones’ was probably a Roman nickname for the emerging Caledonian tribe of northern Scotland, although their lands would eventually include much of Scotland.

The Picti or ‘painted ones’ was probably a Roman nickname for the emerging Caledonian tribe of northern Scotland, although their lands would eventually include much of Scotland.

A 'Class II Pictish Symbol Stone', located in Meigle Museum, Meigle, Perthshire

A 'Class II Pictish Symbol Stone', located in Meigle Museum, Meigle, Perthshire

Symbols on the reverse of a Pictish cross slab, known as 'Rodney's Stone', from Dyke Parish Church, Brodie, Moray in Scotland

Symbols on the reverse of a Pictish cross slab, known as 'Rodney's Stone', from Dyke Parish Church, Brodie, Moray in Scotland

Jarlshof, Scotland - The Most Amazing Historical Site I've Ever Seen. Are you going to add this to your bucket list?

Jarlshof - The Most Amazing Historical Site I've Ever Seen

Jarlshof, Scotland - The Most Amazing Historical Site I've Ever Seen. Are you going to add this to your bucket list?

The Hilton of Cadboll Stone is a Class II Pictish stone discovered at Hilton of Cadboll, on the Tarbat Peninsula in Easter Ross, Scotland. It is one of the most magnificent of all Pictish cross-slabs. On the seaward-facing side is a Christian cross, and on the landward facing side are secular depictions.

The Hilton of Cadboll Stone is a Class II Pictish stone discovered at Hilton of Cadboll, on the Tarbat Peninsula in Easter Ross, Scotland. It is one of the most magnificent of all Pictish cross-slabs. On the seaward-facing side is a Christian cross, and on the landward facing side are secular depictions.

A, late-16th century, vision of a Pictish warrior (clearly based on Herodian's description of the “barbarians” of Caledonia) by John White. The overall blue tinting of the body is inspired by a remark made by Julius Caesar, who had spent a few weeks in the south-eastern corner of Britain in 55BC and 54BC: “All the Britons, without exception, stain themselves with woad, which produces a blueish tint; and this gives them a wild look in battle.”

A, late-16th century, vision of a Pictish warrior (clearly based on Herodian's description of the “barbarians” of Caledonia) by John White. The overall blue tinting of the body is inspired by a remark made by Julius Caesar, who had spent a few weeks in the south-eastern corner of Britain in 55BC and 54BC: “All the Britons, without exception, stain themselves with woad, which produces a blueish tint; and this gives them a wild look in battle.”

Peter Dennis - Pictish Stronghold in Dark Ages Scotland

Peter Dennis - Pictish Stronghold in Dark Ages Scotland

The earliest surviving mention of the Picts dates from AD297.  In a poem praising the Roman emperor Constantius Chlorus, the orator Eumenius wrote that the Britons were already accustomed to the semi-naked "Picti and Hiberni (Irish) as their enemies."

The earliest surviving mention of the Picts dates from AD297. In a poem praising the Roman emperor Constantius Chlorus, the orator Eumenius wrote that the Britons were already accustomed to the semi-naked "Picti and Hiberni (Irish) as their enemies."

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