Occupants of the Pentonville Prison in London, 1967 / Insassen des Pentonville-Gefängnisses in London, 1967  |  © Jürgen Schadeberg / Mitteldeutscher Verlag /   Central German Publishers... ... Old Men, Reading, Books.

Occupants of the Pentonville Prison in London, 1967 / Insassen des Pentonville-Gefängnisses in London, 1967 | © Jürgen Schadeberg / Mitteldeutscher Verlag / Central German Publishers... ... Old Men, Reading, Books.

Charles Dickens' pinnacle setting in Little Dorit, Marshalsea prison in London ,around 1897 (an actual place of residence, for a time, during his childhood.) This was a 'Debtors Prison' where whole families would be placed, and rarely left!

Charles Dickens' pinnacle setting in Little Dorit, Marshalsea prison in London ,around 1897 (an actual place of residence, for a time, during his childhood.) This was a 'Debtors Prison' where whole families would be placed, and rarely left!

"The Clink" - got it's name from a notorious prison in Southwark, England located on Clink street.  It functioned from the 12th century until 1780 and is the oldest men's and women's prison in England. It's name may also derive from the sound of striking metal as the prison's doors were bolted, or the rattling of the chains the prisoners wore.

"The Clink" - got it's name from a notorious prison in Southwark, England located on Clink street. It functioned from the 12th century until 1780 and is the oldest men's and women's prison in England. It's name may also derive from the sound of striking metal as the prison's doors were bolted, or the rattling of the chains the prisoners wore.

The Blue plaque on the former site of the prison in Southwark, London that was known as The Clink. It had a debtor's entrance in Stoney Street. This prison gave rise to the British slang term for being incarcerated in any prison, hence "in the clink". Its location also gave rise to the term for being financially embarrassed, "stoney broke".

The Blue plaque on the former site of the prison in Southwark, London that was known as The Clink. It had a debtor's entrance in Stoney Street. This prison gave rise to the British slang term for being incarcerated in any prison, hence "in the clink". Its location also gave rise to the term for being financially embarrassed, "stoney broke".

A view of rioters setting fire to Newgate Prison in 1780 during the Gordon Riots. Various banners can be seen with anti Papist statements on.-- also good web resource about all the 18th c. jails in London

A view of rioters setting fire to Newgate Prison in 1780 during the Gordon Riots. Various banners can be seen with anti Papist statements on.-- also good web resource about all the 18th c. jails in London

These Mugshots of Prisoners in London are Unusual Compared with the Standard of Prison Photography from the 1890s

These Mugshots of Prisoners in London are Unusual Compared with the Standard of Prison Photography from the 1890s

Newgate Prison was a prison in London, at the corner of Newgate Street and Old Bailey just inside the City of London. It was originally located at the site of Newgate, a gate in the Roman London Wall. The gate/prison was rebuilt in the 12th century, and demolished in 1904. The prison was extended and rebuilt many times, and remained in use for over 700 years, from 1188 to 1902.

Newgate Prison was a prison in London, at the corner of Newgate Street and Old Bailey just inside the City of London. It was originally located at the site of Newgate, a gate in the Roman London Wall. The gate/prison was rebuilt in the 12th century, and demolished in 1904. The prison was extended and rebuilt many times, and remained in use for over 700 years, from 1188 to 1902.

This is Ruth Ellis. She murdered her lover, David Blakeney, a racing car driver. She was executed at Holloway (Women's) prison in London. The last woman to be executed in Britain.

This is Ruth Ellis. She murdered her lover, David Blakeney, a racing car driver. She was executed at Holloway (Women's) prison in London. The last woman to be executed in Britain.

14th July 1943: Despite the war, French people in London celebrate France's Bastille Day by dancing in the streets. They are commemorating the storming of the Bastille prison in Paris on July 14th 1789, during the French Revolution. Original Publication: Picture Post - 1493 - Street Dancing For France's July 14th - pub. 1943 ~

14th July 1943: Despite the war, French people in London celebrate France's Bastille Day by dancing in the streets. They are commemorating the storming of the Bastille prison in Paris on July 14th 1789, during the French Revolution. Original Publication: Picture Post - 1493 - Street Dancing For France's July 14th - pub. 1943 ~

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