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Sideband cooling beyond the quantum backaction limit with squeezed light : Nature : Nature Research

Richard Phillips Feynman (11 May 1918 - 15 Feb 1988) was an American theoretical physicist known for his work in the path integral formulation of quantum mechanics, the theory of quantum electrodynamics, and the physics of the superfluidity of supercooled liquid helium, as well as in particle physics. For his contributions to the development of quantum electrodynamics, Feynman, jointly with Julian Schwinger and Sin-Itiro Tomonaga, received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1965

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Richard Feynman stampa 11x17 - famoso Seniors

Questa stampa si ricorda il fisico americano Richard Feynman. ♦Multi-colorato disegno stampato sul cartoncino di 80 libbre ♦Print misure leggermente

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You, my friend, have made an incredibly good point (31 Photos)

Richard Phillips Feynman (/ˈfaɪnmən/; May 11, 1918 – February 15, 1988) was an American theoretical physicist known for his work in the path integral formulation of quantum mechanics, the theory of quantum electrodynamics, and the physics of the superfluidity of supercooled liquid helium, as well as in particle physics (he proposed the parton model).

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The 10 best physicists

Richard Feynman - Physicist -"Scientific views end in awe and mystery, lost at the edge in uncertainty, but they appear to be so deep and so impressive that the theory that it is all arranged as a stage for God to watch man's struggle for good and evil seems inadequate."

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This decay is forbidden by a symmetry of classical electrodynamics, but Bell and Jackiw showed that this symmetry cannot be preserved at the quantum level. Description from en.wikipedia.org. I searched for this on bing.com/images

Our beliefs should be based on evidence and reality

Our beliefs should be based on evidence and reality, not fairytales and superstition.

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Quantum electrodynamics - Wikipedia

Quantum electrodynamics - Wikipedia