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from About.com Education

How to Turn Baking Soda into Sodium Carbonate or Soda Ash

This is powdered sodium carbonate, also known as washing soda or soda ash. - Ondřej Mangl, public domain

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from About.com Education

How to Turn Baking Soda into Sodium Carbonate or Soda Ash

Make sodium carbonate, also known as washing soda or soda ash, from baking soda. Then experiment with reactions to water and vinegar. (make instead of using ready made to add to the understanding of the child)

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Sodium carbonate - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia =Soda ash for souring cotton =soda crystals can buy in supermarket

from Ranker

Sofía Vergara

Want to know what was in this amazing syrup? Well, one grain (65 mg) of morphine per fluid ounce, cannabis, heroin, powdered opium which are the active ingredients to put your little one to sleep. It also had sodium carbonate, spirits foeniculi, and aqua ammonia in it, because....why not? Removed from the market in 1938 after 89 years of service! :0

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from About.com Education

Interview for College

Interview for College - Before you interview for college, be sure you have answers to these 20 interview questions. This article presents questions and tips for answering the questions to help you prepare to interview for college.

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from LIVESTRONG.COM

What Are the Dangers of Sodium Carbonate & Sodium Silicate & Enzymes?

Sodium carbonate, sodium silicate, and enzymes are three ingredients commonly found in detergents such as dishwasher detergent and laundry detergent,...

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History of sodaThe ancient Egyptians used natural deposits of natron, a mixture consisting mostly of sodium carbonate decahydrate, and sodium bicarbonate. The natron was ground up, solvated, and used as paint for hieroglyphics.In 1791, a French chemist, Nicolas Leblanc, produced sodium carbonate, also known as soda ash.

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from The Next Web

Interactive periodic table finally clues us in to what elements are used for

Looking at the periodic table, most of us have no issues identifying the use of certain elements. Sodium, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and others are no-brainers but what about the less talked about elements. Seriously, do you know what vanadium is used for? How about Polonium? Chances are, you don’t. There are dozens of elements on …