Strange worlds concept design 01, Edin Durmisevic on ArtStation at https://www.artstation.com/artwork/r5YoL

Strange worlds concept design 01, Edin Durmisevic on ArtStation at https://www.artstation.com/artwork/r5YoL

Classic Wally Wood cover to Strange Worlds #4, published by Avon Periodicals, September 1951. Tube guy and tube girl.

Classic Wally Wood cover to Strange Worlds #4, published by Avon Periodicals, September 1951. Tube guy and tube girl.

Strange World - is it bad that I looked at the background designs and thought "wait a minute, that's too angular, that isn't how you write circular Gallifreyan?"

Mystery Minis – April

Strange World - is it bad that I looked at the background designs and thought "wait a minute, that's too angular, that isn't how you write circular Gallifreyan?"

Strange Worlds N°5 (January 1952) - Cover art by Wally Wood/  #vintagehorrorscifi

Strange Worlds N°5 (January 1952) - Cover art by Wally Wood/ #vintagehorrorscifi

P H O T O G R A P H Y - S T Y L E Creating beautiful strange worlds, boosting them with sometimes surreal dimensions, using extreme fashion styling and props. Dreamy and languid light, combined with some bokeh on the way.

P H O T O G R A P H Y - S T Y L E Creating beautiful strange worlds, boosting them with sometimes surreal dimensions, using extreme fashion styling and props. Dreamy and languid light, combined with some bokeh on the way.

Strange Worlds by Matthew Albanese. • #strangeworlds #matthewalbanese #landscape #photography #periodictable

Strange Worlds

Strange Worlds by Matthew Albanese. • #strangeworlds #matthewalbanese #landscape #photography #periodictable

Matthew Albanese Strange Worlds

Strange Worlds

Matthew Albanese Strange Worlds

Matthew Albanese began his Strange Worlds project in 2008, he says, it was very much about “tricking the eye.”    “I would describe the photography that I do as small scale dioramas that I build by hand out of everyday, simple, mundane materials and transform them into an image through the lens of my camera making them look hyper-realistic. I’ve used ostrich feathers to create willow trees. I’ve used steel wool to create a tornado. Nothing is off limits.”

Matthew Albanese began his Strange Worlds project in 2008, he says, it was very much about “tricking the eye.” “I would describe the photography that I do as small scale dioramas that I build by hand out of everyday, simple, mundane materials and transform them into an image through the lens of my camera making them look hyper-realistic. I’ve used ostrich feathers to create willow trees. I’ve used steel wool to create a tornado. Nothing is off limits.”

Pinterest
Search