Julia Agrippina, most commonly referred to as Agrippina Minor or Agrippina the Younger, and after 50 known as Julia Augusta Agrippina was a Roman Empress and one of the more prominent women in the Julio-Claudian dynasty. She was a great-granddaughter of the Emperor Augustus, great-niece and adoptive granddaughter of the Emperor Tiberius, sister of the Emperor Caligula, niece and fourth wife of the Emperor Claudius, and mother of the Emperor Nero.

Julia Agrippina, most commonly referred to as Agrippina Minor or Agrippina the Younger, and after 50 known as Julia Augusta Agrippina was a Roman Empress and one of the more prominent women in the Julio-Claudian dynasty. She was a great-granddaughter of the Emperor Augustus, great-niece and adoptive granddaughter of the Emperor Tiberius, sister of the Emperor Caligula, niece and fourth wife of the Emperor Claudius, and mother of the Emperor Nero.

Key Words for the Emperor:, Strategy, Rulership, Authority, Masculinity, Practicality {Nicoletta Ceccoli, The Emperor}

Key Words for the Emperor:, Strategy, Rulership, Authority, Masculinity, Practicality {Nicoletta Ceccoli, The Emperor}

Emperor Marcus Aurelius, Roman statue (marble), 2nd century AD, (Walters Art Museum, Baltimore).

Emperor Marcus Aurelius, Roman statue (marble), 2nd century AD, (Walters Art Museum, Baltimore).

Julia, second wife of Tiberius. She was daughter of the Emperor Augustus, stepsister of her husband Tiberius, maternal grandmother of the emperor Caligula and the empress Agrippina the Younger, grandmother-in-law of the Emperor Claudius, and maternal great-grandmother of the Emperor Nero. Exiled by her own father because of her depraved sexual life.

Julia, second wife of Tiberius. She was daughter of the Emperor Augustus, stepsister of her husband Tiberius, maternal grandmother of the emperor Caligula and the empress Agrippina the Younger, grandmother-in-law of the Emperor Claudius, and maternal great-grandmother of the Emperor Nero. Exiled by her own father because of her depraved sexual life.

The Emperor from the Visconti C Tarot Deck  (aka Brera Brambilla Tarot Deck) One of the earliest Tarot Decks, the Brera Brambilla Visconti Deck is entirely gilded, with fine paintings upon it.  Provenance  Italy, 1450s

The Emperor from the Visconti C Tarot Deck (aka Brera Brambilla Tarot Deck) One of the earliest Tarot Decks, the Brera Brambilla Visconti Deck is entirely gilded, with fine paintings upon it. Provenance Italy, 1450s

Part II. Attila the Hun (c.403? - 453 AD) He was brought up as a barbarian hostage at the court of the emperor Honorius. Attila knew the Roman world. On several occasions he assaulted the Roman Empire. In 451, Flavius Aetius defeated Attila and the Huns at the   Battle of Chalons. In 453 Attila died from a burst blood vessel; the Hun Empire collapsed.

Part II. Attila the Hun (c.403? - 453 AD) He was brought up as a barbarian hostage at the court of the emperor Honorius. Attila knew the Roman world. On several occasions he assaulted the Roman Empire. In 451, Flavius Aetius defeated Attila and the Huns at the Battle of Chalons. In 453 Attila died from a burst blood vessel; the Hun Empire collapsed.

The ram is also a symbol of Aries, the astral ruler of the Emperor. In his right hand, the Emperor holds an Ankh, the Egyptian symbol of Life, and in his left is an orb representing the world over which he rules. The orange background and the Emperor’s red clothing symbolise his passion and energy for life and the challenges it offers.

The ram is also a symbol of Aries, the astral ruler of the Emperor. In his right hand, the Emperor holds an Ankh, the Egyptian symbol of Life, and in his left is an orb representing the world over which he rules. The orange background and the Emperor’s red clothing symbolise his passion and energy for life and the challenges it offers.

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