FIRE OF LONDON CAKES - Of the many events recorded in Samuel Pepys' Diaries, the Fire of London is one of the most significant. An article in The Guardian of January 9th, 2001, suggests that the fire was caused by burning some small cakes. Here is a contemporary recipe for the cakes which might have caused the Great Fire of London.  - Stuart Recipe  (cookit.e2bn.org)

FIRE OF LONDON CAKES - Of the many events recorded in Samuel Pepys' Diaries, the Fire of London is one of the most significant. An article in The Guardian of January 9th, 2001, suggests that the fire was caused by burning some small cakes. Here is a contemporary recipe for the cakes which might have caused the Great Fire of London. - Stuart Recipe (cookit.e2bn.org)

Outside the Monument to the Great Fire of London, as seen on the Family Travel Times blo

Outside the Monument to the Great Fire of London, as seen on the Family Travel Times blo

Great Fire painting, 1670s (27.142) Showing the fire from either Newgate or Ludgate with St Paul’s Cathedral in the background. © Museum of London

Great Fire painting, 1670s (27.142) Showing the fire from either Newgate or Ludgate with St Paul’s Cathedral in the background. © Museum of London

The Great Fire of London destroyed over 400 acres of London, including 13,200 houses and 87 out of 109 churches. Tucked away in a small street in Farringdon, however, is a lonely survivor - 41 and 42 Cloth Fair. Built between 1597 and 1614, this house is sometimes described as the oldest in London. It may have only survived the fire because it was sheltered by the walls of a nearby priory.

10 buildings that survived the Great Fire of London

The Great Fire of London destroyed over 400 acres of London, including 13,200 houses and 87 out of 109 churches. Tucked away in a small street in Farringdon, however, is a lonely survivor - 41 and 42 Cloth Fair. Built between 1597 and 1614, this house is sometimes described as the oldest in London. It may have only survived the fire because it was sheltered by the walls of a nearby priory.

the fire of london - Αναζήτηση Google

the fire of london - Αναζήτηση Google

This beautiful building in Fleet Street, known as "Prince Henry's Room", managed to escape the ravages of the fire. Once a tavern where Samuel Pepys liked to cavort, its intricately decorated plaster Jacobean ceiling is one of its most impressive features.

10 buildings that survived the Great Fire of London

This beautiful building in Fleet Street, known as "Prince Henry's Room", managed to escape the ravages of the fire. Once a tavern where Samuel Pepys liked to cavort, its intricately decorated plaster Jacobean ceiling is one of its most impressive features.

Quote: "This is an art display for our topic of The Great Fire of London (Year 2). The children each contributed to the border using oil pastels. The fire silhouette pictures were created using watercolour paint and then black pencil crayons over the top once the paint had dried. We looked at photographs of fire as well as a number of sunset silhouette photographs for inspiration."

Quote: "This is an art display for our topic of The Great Fire of London (Year 2). The children each contributed to the border using oil pastels. The fire silhouette pictures were created using watercolour paint and then black pencil crayons over the top once the paint had dried. We looked at photographs of fire as well as a number of sunset silhouette photographs for inspiration."

The Monument to the Great Fire of London, more commonly known simply as the Monument, is a stone Roman Doric column in the City of London, near the northern end of London Bridge, which commemorates the Great Fire of London.

The Monument to the Great Fire of London, more commonly known simply as the Monument, is a stone Roman Doric column in the City of London, near the northern end of London Bridge, which commemorates the Great Fire of London.

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