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The Three/Fifths Compromise and the Humanity of Slaves

35 Founding Fathers Quotes that prove America was not, and was never intended to be, founded on Christianity alone. The Founding Fathers felt the USA was to be ABOVE all of that, with the common law and peace of society to be the most valued principles.

The "Three-Fifths" compromise. The Constitutional Convention in 1787 compromised the population count of slaves by counting each slave as three-fifths of a person | African American Registry

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The Three-Fifths Compromise was a compromise reached between delegates from southern states and those from northern states during the 1787 United States Constitutional Convention. The debate was over whether, and if so, how, slaves would be counted when determining a state's total population for legislative representation and taxing purposes

The Three-Fifths Compromise is one of most controversial decisions in u.s. history what is the Three-Fifths Compromise and what is its purpose

Included you will find: 1 flippable for the three branches of government 1 flippable for the Great Compromise 1 flippable for the Three- fifths Compromise Power Point that includes notes for each flippable 1 processing activity that asks students to create Tweets from the Convention All activities come with examples for both the teacher and the student.

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KNOW YOUR BLACK HISTORY: A Terrible Compromise - When Black Americans became “three-fifths of a person” (by AP Contributor Nick Douglas) —> http://www.afropunk.com/profiles/blogs/feature-a-terrible-compromise-when-black-americans-became-three “In 1783 the “compromise” was included in the Articles of Confederation. It was not about legitimate political representation. It was about counting slaves to increase the number of Congressional seats held by white southerners. It would give Southern…

This graphic organizer allows students to compare the CT Compromise (Sometimes called the Great Compromise)and the three fifths Compromise when discussing the United States Constitution.

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