Welsh alphabet. Note that there is no J, K, Q, V, X or Z. However the most common surname in Wales is Jones, and there is a little village called Vivod.

Welsh alphabet. Note that there is no J, K, Q, V, X or Z. However the most common surname in Wales is Jones, and there is a little village called Vivod.

Welsh alphabet (haven't been able to track down a year for this, but it's clearly made in echo of hornbook-style)

Welsh alphabet (haven't been able to track down a year for this, but it's clearly made in echo of hornbook-style)

Learn the Welsh Alphabet! Learn the Welsh Alphabet to begin with... - YouTube

Learn the Welsh Alphabet! Learn the Welsh Alphabet to begin with... - YouTube

A fun place to start!.....but......it might have been beneficial if they got it right in the first place!!!!! Check out the letters of the alphabet - it's in English.....not in Welsh!!!!! LOL!!!!! Welsh has it's own alphabet!!! The print is too small to check if the words are correct or not!

A fun place to start!.....but......it might have been beneficial if they got it right in the first place!!!!! Check out the letters of the alphabet - it's in English.....not in Welsh!!!!! LOL!!!!! Welsh has it's own alphabet!!! The print is too small to check if the words are correct or not!

Welsh pronunciation chart. Also check this site  http://www.go4awalk.com/fell-facts/welsh-language-pronunciation.php

Welsh pronunciation chart. Also check this site http://www.go4awalk.com/fell-facts/welsh-language-pronunciation.php

Ogham (᚛ᚑᚌᚐᚋ᚜) is an alphabet that appears on monumental inscriptions dating from the 4th to the 6th century AD, and in manuscripts dating from the 6th to the 9th century. It was used mainly to write Primitive and Old Irish, and also to write Old Welsh, Pictish and Latin. It was inscribed on stone monuments throughout Ireland, particuarly Kerry, Cork and Waterford, and in England, Scotland, the Isle of Man and Wales, particularly in Pembrokeshire in south Wales. (...)

Ogham (᚛ᚑᚌᚐᚋ᚜) is an alphabet that appears on monumental inscriptions dating from the 4th to the 6th century AD, and in manuscripts dating from the 6th to the 9th century. It was used mainly to write Primitive and Old Irish, and also to write Old Welsh, Pictish and Latin. It was inscribed on stone monuments throughout Ireland, particuarly Kerry, Cork and Waterford, and in England, Scotland, the Isle of Man and Wales, particularly in Pembrokeshire in south Wales. (...)

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