Wood Sorrel

Wood Sorrel   Scientific name: Oxalis species  What: leaves  How: salad, seasoning  Where: shady undergrowth  When: spring, summer  Nutritional Value: Vitamins A & C   Dangers: Contains some oxalic acid, limit consumption to a small handful per day.

april Wood Sorrel Scientific name: Oxalis species What: leaves How: salad, seasoning Where: shady undergrowth When: spring, summer Nutritional Value: Vitamins A & C Dangers: Contains some oxalic acid, limit consumption to a small handful per day.

Wood sorrel has been eaten by humans for millennia. In Dr. James Duke's "Handbook of Edible Weeds," he notes that the Kiowa Indian tribe chewed wood sorrel to alleviate thirst on long trips, that the Potawatomi Indians cooked it with sugar to make a dessert, the Algonquin Indians considered it an aphrodisiac, the Cherokee tribe ate wood sorrel to alleviate mouth sores and a sore throat, and the Iroquois ate wood sorrel to help with cramps, fever and nausea.

Oxalis acetosella or common wood sorrel. In Finnish, this edible green is known as käenkaali or ketunleipä/Wikipedia. Look like the wild clover we have that grows like a weed mixed in with our grass

Wood sorrel gets mistaken for clover because of its three leaves. They are found in grassy areas and the edges of woods. Also called sourgrass because  of its oxalic acid content, it tastes citrisy and refreshing.

Wood Sorrel (genus Oxalis), or sourgrass, is a medium sized edible plant that occurs throughout most of North America. Within the genus Oxalis, there are several species. Wood sorrel typically grows a maximum of 15 inches tall. Its small heart-shaped,

The Rural Economist: Wild Edibles #1 Wood Sorrel

The Rural Economist: Wild Edibles Wood Sorrel.no poisonous lookalike

Ketunleipä / Käenkaali / Revonrieska | Oxalis acetosella | Wood sorrel / Common wood sorrel  to: undergrowth for ferns

Wood-sorrel or common wood sorrel Oxalis acetosella Specific name - Acetosella

Wood Sorrel (Oxalis) Edible parts: It's a thirst quencher and is refreshing to eat. The leaves, flowers and immature green seed pods are all edible having a mild sour flavour that resembles lemons. It can be made into tea, added to salads, used in soups/sauces and used as a seasoning.

Wood Sorrel (Oxalis) Edible parts: It's a thirst quencher and is refreshing to eat. The leaves, flowers and immature green seed pods are all edible having a mild sour flavour that resembles lemons. It can be made into tea, added to salads, used in soups/s

Happy St. Patty's day! Wood sorrel is sometimes called American Shamrock. It's a tasty little edible weed that's perfect for beginners to identify. Wood Sorrel foraging tips from the Foraged Foodie!

Wood sorrel is sometimes called American Shamrock. Its a tasty little edible weed thats perfect for beginners to identify. Wood Sorrel foraging tips from the Foraged Foodie!

wood sorrel (mary jo hoffman)

wood sorrel (mary jo hoffman) cute image for st Patrick's day

Wood sorrel (Oxalis acetosella) Deer Resistant Rutgers rating:B

Wood Sorrel symbolises maternal tenderness in the Victorian language of flowers.

Oxalis pes-caprae (Bermuda buttercup, African wood-sorrel, Bermuda sorrel, Buttercup oxalis, Cape sorrel, English weed, Goat's-foot, Sourgrass, Soursob and Soursop; (Afrikaans: Suring) [1]) is a species of tristylous flowering plant in the wood sorrel family

Bermuda buttercup season in Los Angeles. Burmuda buttercup, also known as sourgrass, soursop, African wood-sorrel and many other names, is a member of the wood-sorrel family.

Common wood-sorrel (Oxalis montana) wet shade plant/ ground cover

Presentation : Oxalis montana = We find this beauty only in the forest.

Cottage Pink Wood Sorrel

Cottage Pink Wood Sorrel Oxalis Exposure Part Shade to Shade Season Spring Summer Mature Size 6 - 10 Inches

Pink Wood Sorrel (oxalis rubra): This appears to be one of the wildflower/weed group known as wood sorrels, Oxalis. Plants thrive almost anywhere and can become pesky in garden beds and lawns. Beautiful, though, in the right place.

Pink Wood Sorrel (oxalis rubra): This appears to be one of the wildflower/weed group known as wood sorrels, Oxalis. Plants thrive almost anywhere and can become pesky in garden beds and lawns. Beautiful, though, in the right place.

Never forget the beauty that surrounds us - It gives us peace in our hearts - have a positive day and keep smiling - life is a special gift - pass it on - wood sorrel

Spring - moss with Oxalis acetosella

Cicely Mary Barker

This beautiful Wood Sorrel Flower Fairy Vintage Print by Cicely Mary Barker was printed and is an original book plate from an early Flower Fairy book. Cicely Barker created 168 flower fairy illustrations in total for her many books.

Wood Sorrel! The Cherokee ate wood sorrel to cure sores in their mouths and the Kiowa Indians chewed on the plant to keep from being thirsty. The root can be boiled and eaten and they taste just like a potato.

Poster Print Wall Art Print entitled Wood Sorrel Plants (Oxalis Oregana), None

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