Frank Fu
More ideas from Frank
Kuksa - traditional carved wood burl cup, easy to clean, mostly unbreakable, naturally insulating.

Kuksa - traditional carved wood burl cup, easy to clean, mostly unbreakable, naturally insulating.

SUKEYUKI
 Okimono c1890 SUKEYUKI, Japan, Carved wood Okimono of a human skull with snake.

SUKEYUKI Okimono c1890 SUKEYUKI, Japan, Carved wood Okimono of a human skull with snake.

Skull and Raven・Hiraga Meigyokusai・Ivory

Skull and Raven・Hiraga Meigyokusai・Ivory

Okimono c1890 SUKEYUKI, Japan Carved wood Okimono of a human skull with snake    Description  Unusually large fine carved wood okimono of a human skull entwined with a snake Japanese circa 1890    Maker  Signed Dai Nihon Sukeyuki zo    Date  Meiji period, circa 1890    Origin  Japan    Condition Report  Excellent with a deep colour and patina.

Okimono c1890 SUKEYUKI, Japan Carved wood Okimono of a human skull with snake Description Unusually large fine carved wood okimono of a human skull entwined with a snake Japanese circa 1890 Maker Signed Dai Nihon Sukeyuki zo Date Meiji period, circa 1890 Origin Japan Condition Report Excellent with a deep colour and patina.

Japanese Netsuke skull ! I am a taste-maker & art curator! Contact me I can find it for you. Email --> BusaccaGallery@sbcGlobal.net

Japanese Netsuke skull ! I am a taste-maker & art curator! Contact me I can find it for you. Email --> BusaccaGallery@sbcGlobal.net

Yes okay I love ese because they remind me of dark marks. I can admit it. | Netsuke: Skull and Snake ,   Second half of the 19th century   Japan  State Hermitage Museum

Yes okay I love ese because they remind me of dark marks. I can admit it. | Netsuke: Skull and Snake , Second half of the 19th century Japan State Hermitage Museum

The Mutter Museum in Philadelphia was originally opened in the 1900s for medical students to see in person extremely rare conditions, as well as the effects of diseases that had been cured or eradicated. It still stands today as the best place for medical students to get ”hands on” experience, as well as a popular attraction for locals and tourists alike.

The Mutter Museum in Philadelphia was originally opened in the 1900s for medical students to see in person extremely rare conditions, as well as the effects of diseases that had been cured or eradicated. It still stands today as the best place for medical students to get ”hands on” experience, as well as a popular attraction for locals and tourists alike.