Steven Grey
More ideas from Steven
Present: another modern day display of Yggdrasil the world tree (Steve Prellwitz, 2012)

Present: another modern day display of Yggdrasil the world tree (Steve Prellwitz, 2012)

Persian jambiya, 19th century, steel, bone, gold, H. 17 1/4 in. (43.8 cm); H. of blade 11 1/2 in. (29.2 cm); W. 2 1/8 in. (5.4 cm); Wt. 16.3 oz. (462.1 g), Met Museum, Bequest of George C. Stone, 1935.

Persian jambiya, 19th century, steel, bone, gold, H. 17 1/4 in. (43.8 cm); H. of blade 11 1/2 in. (29.2 cm); W. 2 1/8 in. (5.4 cm); Wt. 16.3 oz. (462.1 g), Met Museum, Bequest of George C. Stone, 1935.

Bragi is the god of poetry, son of Odin and Frigga. Inspire bards and their songs recall the actions of the warriors. The runes are carved on his tongue. It is believed that the historical origin of the cult of Bragi could be in a ninth-century poet named Bragi Boddason, who after his death would have been elevated to the status of god. (Viking Blog elDrakkar.blogspot.com)

Bragi is the god of poetry, son of Odin and Frigga. Inspire bards and their songs recall the actions of the warriors. The runes are carved on his tongue. It is believed that the historical origin of the cult of Bragi could be in a ninth-century poet named Bragi Boddason, who after his death would have been elevated to the status of god. (Viking Blog elDrakkar.blogspot.com)

Skadi, the giant wife of the sea god Njörd. In order to avenge the death of her father, the giant Thiazi, Skadi took arms to attack the rival tribe of the gods (the Aesir) in Asgard, home of the gods. The Aesir, wanting to appease her anger, offered her the choice of one of their number for a husband, with the stipulation that she choose a god by his legs (or feet) alone. She chose Njord, thinking that he was the fair god Balder; their marriage failed because Njord preferred to live by the…

Skadi, the giant wife of the sea god Njörd. In order to avenge the death of her father, the giant Thiazi, Skadi took arms to attack the rival tribe of the gods (the Aesir) in Asgard, home of the gods. The Aesir, wanting to appease her anger, offered her the choice of one of their number for a husband, with the stipulation that she choose a god by his legs (or feet) alone. She chose Njord, thinking that he was the fair god Balder; their marriage failed because Njord preferred to live by the…