Australian Bushrangers, Criminals and Law Enforcement

Bushrangers originally referred to runaway convicts in the early years of the British settlement of Australia who had the survival skills necessary to use the Australian bush as a refuge to hide from the authorities. The term then evolved to refer to those who abandoned social rights and privileges to take up "robbery under arms" as a way of life using the bush as their base.
Bushrangers: Steve Hart, outlaw renowned for being one of the Kelly Gang.

Bushrangers: Steve Hart, outlaw renowned for being one of the Kelly Gang.

Slasher Sid: Sidney Kelly, known as 'Siddy' to his nefarious gang mates wore flashy suits, drove a nice car and had no compunction about slashing the faces of women or men with his weapon of choice, a razor. Kelly used his considerable influence to beat the law but went down in Melbourne for a razor attack, for which he received nine years' prison and 15 lashes from the cat o' nine tails. He died, fabulously wealthy, at the age of 48

Revealed: true stories of the crooks and gangsters in old mug shots

Slasher Sid: Sidney Kelly, known as 'Siddy' to his nefarious gang mates wore flashy suits, drove a nice car and had no compunction about slashing the faces of women or men with his weapon of choice, a razor. Kelly used his considerable influence to beat the law but went down in Melbourne for a razor attack, for which he received nine years' prison and 15 lashes from the cat o' nine tails. He died, fabulously wealthy, at the age of 48

The Story of the Kelly Gang Poster -- first feature length film

The Story of the Kelly Gang Poster -- first feature length film

Edward "Ned" Kelly (1854 – 1880) was an Australian bushranger, and, to some, a folk hero for his defiance of the colonial authorities. Kelly was born in Victoria to an Irish convict father, and as a young man he clashed with the police. Following an incident at his home in 1878, police parties searched for him in the bush. After he murdered three policemen, the colony proclaimed Kelly and his gang wanted outlaws. A final violent confrontation with police took place at Glenrowan.

9 Most Outrageous Outlaw Heroes

Edward "Ned" Kelly (1854 – 1880) was an Australian bushranger, and, to some, a folk hero for his defiance of the colonial authorities. Kelly was born in Victoria to an Irish convict father, and as a young man he clashed with the police. Following an incident at his home in 1878, police parties searched for him in the bush. After he murdered three policemen, the colony proclaimed Kelly and his gang wanted outlaws. A final violent confrontation with police took place at Glenrowan.

In 1870 Ned Kelly, just released from the Kyneton police lockup for helping the bushranger Harry Power, wrote this letter to Sergeant Babington of the Kyneton Police pleading for his help. It was rumored that Ned had informed on legendary bushranger Harry Power and thus he was was being treated with hostility within the community. This is the only surviving recorded document bearing Ned Kelly's handwriting.

In 1870 Ned Kelly, just released from the Kyneton police lockup for helping the bushranger Harry Power, wrote this letter to Sergeant Babington of the Kyneton Police pleading for his help. It was rumored that Ned had informed on legendary bushranger Harry Power and thus he was was being treated with hostility within the community. This is the only surviving recorded document bearing Ned Kelly's handwriting.

Henry Johnstone alias Harry Power Ned Kelly's alleged mentor

Henry Johnstone alias Harry Power Ned Kelly's alleged mentor

Sergeant Michael Kennedy, one of the three police shot down by Kelly and his band of outlaws at Stringybark Creek, near Mansfield, in 1878.

Sergeant Michael Kennedy, one of the three police shot down by Kelly and his band of outlaws at Stringybark Creek, near Mansfield, in 1878.

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