Australian Rules Football

Australian rules football is a sport between two teams of 18 who move an oval ball by kicking, handballing and running with the ball. A distinctive feature is the mark where a player who catches the ball from a kick is awarded possession. The original rules are attributed to the sportsman Tom Wills to form a "football club with a code of laws" to keep cricketers fit during winter. The earliest recorded match was played on 15 June 1858 between Scotch College and Melbourne Grammar School.
Victoria, Australia 1960s: April 1960: Footscray footballer Ted Whitten taking a mark against North Melbourne at the ...

Victoria, Australia 1960s: April 1960: Footscray footballer Ted Whitten taking a mark against North Melbourne at the ...

Melbourne Cricket Ground - "The MCG"; hallowed ground for Footy fans and home to the AFL Grand Final Match, the "Super Bowl" for Aussie rules football...

Melbourne Cricket Ground - "The MCG"; hallowed ground for Footy fans and home to the AFL Grand Final Match, the "Super Bowl" for Aussie rules football...

Richmond Football Club member's ticket for 1971

Richmond Football Club member's ticket for 1971

Geelong, Gary Ablett Snr. #5 star forward.

Geelong, Gary Ablett Snr. #5 star forward.

VFL Legend Ron Barassi on the field after the round five AFL match between the Melbourne Demons and the Kangaroos at the Melbourne Cricket Ground April 29, 2006.

VFL Legend Ron Barassi on the field after the round five AFL match between the Melbourne Demons and the Kangaroos at the Melbourne Cricket Ground April 29, 2006.

VALE JACK DYER    To mark the passing of club legend Jack Dyer, the Richmond cheer squad went out of its way with a giant banner that included the likeness of the great Captain Blood. The words accompanying the picture read: “Heaven’s football team can now take the field because your captain has arrived. Jack Dyer, 1913-2003.” It was a fitting tribute to one of the greats of Australian football.

VALE JACK DYER To mark the passing of club legend Jack Dyer, the Richmond cheer squad went out of its way with a giant banner that included the likeness of the great Captain Blood. The words accompanying the picture read: “Heaven’s football team can now take the field because your captain has arrived. Jack Dyer, 1913-2003.” It was a fitting tribute to one of the greats of Australian football.

James "Jim" Stynes (23 April 1966 – 20 March 2012) was an Irish footballer best known for his career as a professional Australian Rules footballer and administrator. He was also a philanthropist, charity worker and writer.  During an extraordinary 264-game career with Melbourne Football Club in the Australian Football League, Stynes become the only non-Australian-born player to win the prestigious Brownlow Medal.  After retirement he was inducted into the Australian Football Hall of Fame.

James "Jim" Stynes (23 April 1966 – 20 March 2012) was an Irish footballer best known for his career as a professional Australian Rules footballer and administrator. He was also a philanthropist, charity worker and writer. During an extraordinary 264-game career with Melbourne Football Club in the Australian Football League, Stynes become the only non-Australian-born player to win the prestigious Brownlow Medal. After retirement he was inducted into the Australian Football Hall of Fame.

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