Hills Hoist Ad - Australian Women's Weekly, November 1956

Australian mid-century advertising

Carnival fun -- How easy it is to turn a typical backyard into a beach-style retreat — careful, you may never want to move out of the garden! We've thrown assorted colourful textiles over the clothesline to create a gorgeous tent-like affair. Mix up the patterns for visual interest. The Hills Hoist has never looked so good! Not only is our glorious tent perfect for shade, but it becomes a space for kids' imaginative play.

Carnival fun -- How easy it is to turn a typical backyard into a beach-style retreat — careful, you may never want to move out of the garden! We've thrown assorted colourful textiles over the clothesline to create a gorgeous tent-like affair. Mix up the patterns for visual interest. The Hills Hoist has never looked so good! Not only is our glorious tent perfect for shade, but it becomes a space for kids' imaginative play.

HILLS HOISTS- invented by an Aussie,  The feature that changed the Australian backyard.

HILLS HOISTS- invented by an Aussie, The feature that changed the Australian backyard.

Meanwhile in Australia, kids are swinging on the Hills Hoist

Meanwhile in Australia, kids are swinging on the Hills Hoist

A Hills Hoist is a height-adjustable rotary clothes line, manufactured in Adelaide, South Australia by Lance Hill since 1945. The Hills Hoist and similar rotary clothes hoists remain a common fixture in many backyards in Australia and New Zealand. They are  one of Australia's most recognisable icons, and are used frequently by artists as a metaphor for Australian suburbia in the 1950s and 1960s. Although originally a product name, the term "Hills Hoist" became a household name in Australia.

A Hills Hoist is a height-adjustable rotary clothes line, manufactured in Adelaide, South Australia by Lance Hill since 1945. The Hills Hoist and similar rotary clothes hoists remain a common fixture in many backyards in Australia and New Zealand. They are one of Australia's most recognisable icons, and are used frequently by artists as a metaphor for Australian suburbia in the 1950s and 1960s. Although originally a product name, the term "Hills Hoist" became a household name in Australia.

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