The Other Anzacs: The Extraordinary Story Of Our World War I Nurses

The Other Anzacs: The Extraordinary Story Of Our World War I Nurses

The Aitape–Wewak campaign was one of the final campaigns of the Pacific Theatre of World War II. Between November 1944 and the end of the war in August 1945, the Australian 6th Division, with air and naval support, fought the Imperial Japanese 18th Army in northern New Guinea. Considered a 'mopping up' operation by the Australians, and although ultimately successful for them with the Japanese forces cleared from the coastal areas and driven inland,

The Aitape–Wewak campaign was one of the final campaigns of the Pacific Theatre of World War II. Between November 1944 and the end of the war in August 1945, the Australian 6th Division, with air and naval support, fought the Imperial Japanese 18th Army in northern New Guinea. Considered a 'mopping up' operation by the Australians, and although ultimately successful for them with the Japanese forces cleared from the coastal areas and driven inland,

New Guinea. 1944-02-17. A Japanese POW with an Australian guard.

New Guinea. 1944-02-17. A Japanese POW with an Australian guard.

Women from the Save Our Sons movement protest in Sydney against conscription of Australian's during the Vietnam War. October 1, 1965.

Women from the Save Our Sons movement protest in Sydney against conscription of Australian's during the Vietnam War. October 1, 1965.

The Campaign in New Guinea, December 1942 - 1943: Australian soldiers advance along the coast toward Salamaua.

The Campaign in New Guinea, December 1942 - 1943: Australian soldiers advance along the coast toward Salamaua.

Create your own poppy for the wall of remembrance at the Australian War Memorial open day

Create your own poppy for the wall of remembrance at the Australian War Memorial open day

Happy Anzac day!  Servicemen played Two-up aboard the troop ship 'Cape Alexander' in Lae, New Guinea, in November 1944. It's a simple game: Two coins are placed tails up and marked with a white cross. They are placed on a kip—a small, flat piece of wood with a handle—and sent up into the air.

A Game to Remember

Happy Anzac day! Servicemen played Two-up aboard the troop ship 'Cape Alexander' in Lae, New Guinea, in November 1944. It's a simple game: Two coins are placed tails up and marked with a white cross. They are placed on a kip—a small, flat piece of wood with a handle—and sent up into the air.

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