The ‘Potato Orphans’ of Australia is a tragic, little-known period in the nation's history, in which thousands of vulnerable teenage women, orphaned by the Great Famine, were shipped from Ireland to be wives for the Australian convicts.

Untold story of Irish teen shipped to Australia to marry a convict

The ‘potato orphans’ of australia is a tragic, little-known period in the nation's history, in which thousands of vulnerable teenage women, orphaned by the great famine, were shipped from Ireland to be wives for the australian convicts.

Convict ship lists, 1840s. Tasmanian Government Archives

Convict ship lists, Tasmanian Government Archives Compare information from a range of sources Identify questions to inform an historical inquiry Locate information related to inquiry questions in a range of sources

FREE book about #Australia #history from Project Gutenberg - Early Australian History, by Charles White. EARLY AUSTRALIAN HISTORY. CONVICT LIFE In New South Wales and Van Diemen's Land. PARTS I & II - THE STORY OF THE TEN GOVERNORS, AND THE STORY OF THE CONVICTS.

Early Australian History - Convict Life in New South Wales and Van Diemen's Land, by Charles White

Ruins at Port Arthur, Tasmania. Former convict settlement on the Tasman peninsula

Church Ruins at Port Arthur, Tasmania. Former convict settlement on the Tasman peninsula

There were eleven ships in the First Fleet. They were all small ships that included two naval ships, six convict ships and three storeships for supplies. This is a picture of the flagship Sirius, which carried Captain Aurthur Philip first govermor of NSW. It was wrecked off Norfolk Island in 1790 and its wreck was given National Heritage status in 2011.

The wreck of a First Fleet ship which once carried Governor Phillip has been given National Heritage status.

Home in the bush of the first convict pardoned in Van Diemen's Land, at Dilston, on the Tamar River, Northern Tasmania, c. 1899.

The isolated bush home of the first convict settler pardoned in Van Diemen's Land, at Dilston, on the Tamar River, Northern Tasmania, Australia.

Australia or jail - which was worse? British criminals convicted at the Old Bailey in the 18th and 19th Centuries were either jailed, hanged, or transported to Australia.

Australia or jail - which was worse?

A research project aims to find out whether transportation to Australia or jail was more effective at rehabilitating British convicts in the and Centuries.

Convict Love Token, c.1787. The convict love token has historical significance as a rare object from the convict era. The love token was given to a loved one as a memento when convicts were sent to the hulks or transported. The love token has intangible significance, being an iconic object and a symbol of one of Australia’s brutal convict origins and early settlement.

Powerhouse Museum - Convict Love Token belonging to Thomas Tilley who arrived on the First Fleet ship Alexander in Find out more about the voyage of the convict ship Alexander at Free Settler or Felon

The Convict System - between 1788 and 1868, 165,000 convicts were transported to Australia.

Convicts" Letter writing at Cockatoo Island N. "Canary Birds" by Philip Doyne Vigors 1849

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