The Mighty Australian Waler

October 31st, 1917, marks the epic event for which Waler is famous; when two regiments of Lighthorse, the 4th, Victorians, and the 12th, New South Wales, charged the Turkish defences of Beersheba, Palestine. With bayonets in their hands, the Light Horsemen and their Waler steeds charged over six kilometers of open ground against the Turkish and German guns. Only one came home; 'Sandy', the mount of Major-General W.T. Bridges; who died at sea on May 18, 1915 from wounds sustained at Gallipoli.
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Australian horses were again more reliable and showed greater endurance than the other breeds. About 160,000 Australian horses served in World War 1 and their performance was best summed up by R.M. Preston D.S.O. in his book "The Desert Mounted Corps" - "The majority of horses in the Corps were Walers and there is no doubt that these hardy Australian horses make the finest cavalry mounts in the world".  Frank Derrick - Monto Troup 5th Light Horse Regiment

Australian horses were again more reliable and showed greater endurance than the other breeds. About 160,000 Australian horses served in World War 1 and their performance was best summed up by R.M. Preston D.S.O. in his book "The Desert Mounted Corps" - "The majority of horses in the Corps were Walers and there is no doubt that these hardy Australian horses make the finest cavalry mounts in the world". Frank Derrick - Monto Troup 5th Light Horse Regiment

Lest We Forget all the fallen diggers and their brave mounts that fought for Australia in WWI. Where would be without them…

Lest We Forget all the fallen diggers and their brave mounts that fought for Australia in WWI. Where would be without them…

Pictured Right is Colin Harrington Macleod of the 1st Light horse Regiment.

Pictured Right is Colin Harrington Macleod of the 1st Light horse Regiment.

Light Horse Training.  Due to various attempts to establish a compulsory training regime, ultimately overshadowed by recommendations of a report by Lord Kitchener following his inspection of   1910, most of the other ranks in the light horse were young, 19-20.  They served under conditions where they were precluded from service outside the borders of the Commonwealth (of Australia).

Light Horse Training. Due to various attempts to establish a compulsory training regime, ultimately overshadowed by recommendations of a report by Lord Kitchener following his inspection of 1910, most of the other ranks in the light horse were young, 19-20. They served under conditions where they were precluded from service outside the borders of the Commonwealth (of Australia).

Mounted Infantry, required to perform only the duties pertaining to infantry who are temporarily provided with increased means of mobility. Light Horse units used horse-holders to enhance mobility, in order to engage the enemy, the lighthorsemen would dismount, handing their reins to one of their number who would move the horses out of the combat area.  A trained horseholder could handle up to five extra horses.

Mounted Infantry, required to perform only the duties pertaining to infantry who are temporarily provided with increased means of mobility. Light Horse units used horse-holders to enhance mobility, in order to engage the enemy, the lighthorsemen would dismount, handing their reins to one of their number who would move the horses out of the combat area. A trained horseholder could handle up to five extra horses.

Bill the Bastard | Light Horse Memorial in Albury Street, Murrumburrah.

Bill the Bastard | Light Horse Memorial in Albury Street, Murrumburrah.

Australian Light Horse Monument, Beersheba Memorial

Australian Light Horse Monument, Beersheba Memorial

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