Umibozu is a sea spirit in Japanese Folklore. In Japanese Mythology, they are said to live in the depths of the ocean. On calm nights, when there is no sign of anything out of the ordinary, when all of a sudden, without warning, the waves and weather  whip into furious condition, and out comes the titanic creature. It moves to destroy the ship, either smashing it with a single blow or taking it down bit by bit.

Umibozu is a sea spirit in Japanese Folklore. In Japanese Mythology, they are said to live in the depths of the ocean. On calm nights, when there is no sign of anything out of the ordinary, when all of a sudden, without warning, the waves and weather whip into furious condition, and out comes the titanic creature. It moves to destroy the ship, either smashing it with a single blow or taking it down bit by bit.

In Japanese Mythology, the Onamazu is a gigantic catfish which live in the muck and slime of waterways in Japan. They are responsible for causing earthquakes due to their heavy mass when they get excited they shake the earth with their continous violent thrashing.

In Japanese Mythology, the Onamazu is a gigantic catfish which live in the muck and slime of waterways in Japan. They are responsible for causing earthquakes due to their heavy mass when they get excited they shake the earth with their continous violent thrashing.

A screenshot in Princess Mononoke of a tatarigami (curse spirit) which are depicted as worms surrounding the wild boar acting as a plague as it has been possessed.

A screenshot in Princess Mononoke of a tatarigami (curse spirit) which are depicted as worms surrounding the wild boar acting as a plague as it has been possessed.

Screen capture of film Pom Poko. The image showcases Gashadokuro meaning "starving skeleton" are mythical creatures in Japanese Mythology. These skeletal giants roam around the darkest hours after midnight, they silently creep up and catch their victims late out on the roads, crushing their victims with its hands or bitting their heads off.

Screen capture of film Pom Poko. The image showcases Gashadokuro meaning "starving skeleton" are mythical creatures in Japanese Mythology. These skeletal giants roam around the darkest hours after midnight, they silently creep up and catch their victims late out on the roads, crushing their victims with its hands or bitting their heads off.

An ubiquitous character in Japanese Folklore, religion and popular culture, the Oni may be variously translated into English as "demon," "devil," or "ogre." Oni features in numerous folktales and legends. The oni are commonly imagined as large, powerful, frightening, human like male figures, clawed hands and sharp, protruding fangs. They have horns, carry an iron staff or club and wear a loincloth made out of tiger skin.

An ubiquitous character in Japanese Folklore, religion and popular culture, the Oni may be variously translated into English as "demon," "devil," or "ogre." Oni features in numerous folktales and legends. The oni are commonly imagined as large, powerful, frightening, human like male figures, clawed hands and sharp, protruding fangs. They have horns, carry an iron staff or club and wear a loincloth made out of tiger skin.

A scene capture in the film Princess Mononoke. The image is of a forest spirit described as the "god of life and death" which takes the form of a deer during the day, and a giant shadowy night walker during the night which you see in this image. In Japanese Mythology, this giant creature is an interpretation of a "Daidarabotchi" - a giant yokai in Japanese Folklore.

A scene capture in the film Princess Mononoke. The image is of a forest spirit described as the "god of life and death" which takes the form of a deer during the day, and a giant shadowy night walker during the night which you see in this image. In Japanese Mythology, this giant creature is an interpretation of a "Daidarabotchi" - a giant yokai in Japanese Folklore.

A screenshot of a scene in the film "The Tale of Princess Kaguya". The film is an animated adaption of a Japanese Folktale called "The Tale of the Bamboo Cutter", a story about a mysterious girl named "Kaguya" discovered inside a bright bamboo plant as a baby.

A screenshot of a scene in the film "The Tale of Princess Kaguya". The film is an animated adaption of a Japanese Folktale called "The Tale of the Bamboo Cutter", a story about a mysterious girl named "Kaguya" discovered inside a bright bamboo plant as a baby.

In Japanese Mythology, Yamauba is an old woman who lives in the mountains. The word Yamauba means "mountain old woman". She is one of the best-known yokai in Japan. In legends, folk-tales, and local beliefs, she is often portrayed as a hideous witch-like being who kidnaps women from local villagers, eats livestock and small children, and torments anybody who wonders into her territory. However, there are also positive portrayals of Yamauba in which she is a deific and beneficial presence.

In Japanese Mythology, Yamauba is an old woman who lives in the mountains. The word Yamauba means "mountain old woman". She is one of the best-known yokai in Japan. In legends, folk-tales, and local beliefs, she is often portrayed as a hideous witch-like being who kidnaps women from local villagers, eats livestock and small children, and torments anybody who wonders into her territory. However, there are also positive portrayals of Yamauba in which she is a deific and beneficial presence.

Scene in Pom Poko. The screenshot of this scene is of Umibozu(s) attempting to flood and destroy a city through an unstoppable gigantic tidal wave. This scene is an adaptation showcasing the legendary sea creature "Umibozu" in Japanese Folklore.

Scene in Pom Poko. The screenshot of this scene is of Umibozu(s) attempting to flood and destroy a city through an unstoppable gigantic tidal wave. This scene is an adaptation showcasing the legendary sea creature "Umibozu" in Japanese Folklore.

Isonade are mysterious shark-like sea monsters in Japanese Mythology. They scour the rocky coastlines in search for any boats to scuttle and fishermen to snatch. Their bodies appear enormous, and their fins are covered with small metallic barbs. They use these to hook their prey, dragging it deep into the water to be eaten. They are said to appear when the north winds blow and the sea currents change.

Isonade are mysterious shark-like sea monsters in Japanese Mythology. They scour the rocky coastlines in search for any boats to scuttle and fishermen to snatch. Their bodies appear enormous, and their fins are covered with small metallic barbs. They use these to hook their prey, dragging it deep into the water to be eaten. They are said to appear when the north winds blow and the sea currents change.

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