Ivy Leaved Violet Native Violet (viola hederaceae): This appears to be an Australian native violet from open forests in eastern NSW and down the coast to Tasmania.  It grows best as an understory plant or in containers and rockeries.

Ivy Leaved Violet Native Violet (viola hederaceae): This appears to be an Australian native violet from open forests in eastern NSW and down the coast to Tasmania. It grows best as an understory plant or in containers and rockeries.

Philodendron (philodendron species): Your plant is a Philodendron, prized for its heart-shaped foliage or cut foliage.  It likes bright indirect light outdoors, well draining soil and moderate water once established  Also popular indoors in containers. Depending on the species and cultivar, the latex from the leaves and the stems/branches can be very irritating to the skin so be sure to wear protective gloves when handling.

Now you can instantly identify just about any flower or plant using Garden Answers, the intelligent plant identification mobile app available for IOS and Android devices.

Baby Tears (soleirolia soleirolii): The tiny leaves in the middle of the photo appear to be Baby Tears, a creeping, mat-forming, evergreen perennial of the nettle family. It is native to certain islands in the western Mediterranean, primarily including Corsica and Sardinia. Winter hardy to USDA Zones 9-11 where it is easily grown in rich, organic, consistently moist but well-drained soils in part shade to full shade. Performs best in bright but indirect light. Best in climates with daytime…

Baby Tears (soleirolia soleirolii): The tiny leaves in the middle of the photo appear to be Baby Tears, a creeping, mat-forming, evergreen perennial of the nettle family. It is native to certain islands in the western Mediterranean, primarily including Corsica and Sardinia. Winter hardy to USDA Zones 9-11 where it is easily grown in rich, organic, consistently moist but well-drained soils in part shade to full shade. Performs best in bright but indirect light. Best in climates with daytime…

Silver Vase Bromeliad (bromeliad): Appears your lovely plant belongs to the Bromeliad genus, and yours bears pink flowering bract and is commonly known as a Silver Vase because of its powdery-silver coating. Indoors needs bright indirect light, water when the soil feels slightly dry to the touch (do not allow plant to sit in water) and feed with a slow release or organic fertilizer during growth and bloom cycles. Does not tolerate winter freeze.

Silver Vase Bromeliad (bromeliad): Appears your lovely plant belongs to the Bromeliad genus, and yours bears pink flowering bract and is commonly known as a Silver Vase because of its powdery-silver coating. Indoors needs bright indirect light, water when the soil feels slightly dry to the touch (do not allow plant to sit in water) and feed with a slow release or organic fertilizer during growth and bloom cycles. Does not tolerate winter freeze.

Ligularia (ligularia dentata): This is an excellent perennial for the shade garden that requires a consistently moist soil.  In the heat of summer it sometimes wilts during the day but should perk up at night.  Later in summer, it produces yellow flowers. Needs partial shade and ample water. Indoors needs bright indirect light and regular water, but will do best if outdoors.

Ligularia (ligularia dentata): This is an excellent perennial for the shade garden that requires a consistently moist soil. In the heat of summer it sometimes wilts during the day but should perk up at night. Later in summer, it produces yellow flowers. Needs partial shade and ample water. Indoors needs bright indirect light and regular water, but will do best if outdoors.

Clivia (clivia miniata): The strap-shaped foliage and characteristic seed pods identifies this as a clivia, a perennial from tuberous rhizomes. Native to South Africa, it bears primarily orange, red, or yellow clusters of funnel-shaped flowers on stalks that emerge above the clumps of foliage in late winter-spring. Following the spent flowers, seed head berries appear that typically ripen to red-orange or yellow. Does not tolerate frost and, when grown outdoors, it needs partial to full…

Clivia (clivia miniata): The strap-shaped foliage and characteristic seed pods identifies this as a clivia, a perennial from tuberous rhizomes. Native to South Africa, it bears primarily orange, red, or yellow clusters of funnel-shaped flowers on stalks that emerge above the clumps of foliage in late winter-spring. Following the spent flowers, seed head berries appear that typically ripen to red-orange or yellow. Does not tolerate frost and, when grown outdoors, it needs partial to full…

False African Violet Or Cape Primrose (streptocarpus saxorum): This appears to be Stretocarpus saxorum is a member of the Streptocarpella subgenus.  Unlike other species of Streptocarpus, the S. saxorum has fuzzy, succulent like foliage with violet blue flowers. Native to Tanzania, it does best in warm climates with light shade or indirect light and moderate water. In winter when dormant, decrease watering allowing the soil to dry out before watering again. During growth and bloom periods…

False African Violet Or Cape Primrose (streptocarpus saxorum): This appears to be Stretocarpus saxorum is a member of the Streptocarpella subgenus. Unlike other species of Streptocarpus, the S. saxorum has fuzzy, succulent like foliage with violet blue flowers. Native to Tanzania, it does best in warm climates with light shade or indirect light and moderate water. In winter when dormant, decrease watering allowing the soil to dry out before watering again. During growth and bloom periods…

Wire Bush (corokia): Looks like a species or hybrid of Corokia, from New Zealand. They are odd twisty shrubs with tiny leaves. Corokia is a genus in the Argophyllaceae family comprising about ten species native to New Zealand and one native to Australia. Corokia species are shrubs or small trees with zigzagging (divaricating) branches. In fact, Corokia cotoneaster is commonly known as wire-netting bush. The stems of the shrubs are dark when mature, covered with downy or silky hairs…

Wire Bush (corokia): Looks like a species or hybrid of Corokia, from New Zealand. They are odd twisty shrubs with tiny leaves. Corokia is a genus in the Argophyllaceae family comprising about ten species native to New Zealand and one native to Australia. Corokia species are shrubs or small trees with zigzagging (divaricating) branches. In fact, Corokia cotoneaster is commonly known as wire-netting bush. The stems of the shrubs are dark when mature, covered with downy or silky hairs…

Iresine (iresine species): Yor reddish shrub looks like it could be Iresine. Iresine is a genus of flowering plants in the amaranth family, Amaranthaceae. It contains 20 to 25 species, all of which are native to the American tropics

Iresine (iresine species): Yor reddish shrub looks like it could be Iresine. Iresine is a genus of flowering plants in the amaranth family, Amaranthaceae. It contains 20 to 25 species, all of which are native to the American tropics

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