The childhood house of Ned Kelly, bushranger, built in 1859 by his father John 'Red' Kelly.

The childhood house of Ned Kelly, bushranger, built in 1859 by his father John 'Red' Kelly.

Ellen Kelly’s release from prison in February 1881 is commemorated by this photo taken at the Kelly homestead. Scarcely more than two months later, Constable Robert Graham visited here with Father Thomas Egan of Wangaratta and gained Mrs Kelly’s help in defusing the ongoing Kelly rebellion.

Ellen Kelly’s release from prison in February 1881 is commemorated by this photo taken at the Kelly homestead. Scarcely more than two months later, Constable Robert Graham visited here with Father Thomas Egan of Wangaratta and gained Mrs Kelly’s help in defusing the ongoing Kelly rebellion.

Shearing Shed, "Clear Creek", north of Bathurst, New South Wales, Australia, showing a typical mixture of original slab walling and iron additions. The iron hinged flaps are opened to allow light and ventilation. Note the detached iron toilet, or 'bush dunny', at left. Photo: Graham Lupp.

Shearing Shed, "Clear Creek", north of Bathurst, New South Wales, Australia, showing a typical mixture of original slab walling and iron additions. The iron hinged flaps are opened to allow light and ventilation. Note the detached iron toilet, or 'bush dunny', at left. Photo: Graham Lupp.

The crew pose for the camera on the front of locomotive #2, as it comes out of the Glowworm tunnel, heading towards Newnes.

The crew pose for the camera on the front of locomotive #2, as it comes out of the Glowworm tunnel, heading towards Newnes.

The Saddlery, Mudgee. By Amber Hooper

The Saddlery, Mudgee. By Amber Hooper

Mudgee railway was the life blood of the town. I remember catching the 'milk run' train to Sydney. The train was an old 'puffing billy' . In winter the train men would slide along the corridors, tin boxes filled with sand that had been sitting with the engine and were very hot. They would cover the boxes with sacking and we would take off our shoes and keep warm. Sadly no trains come to Mudgee now eventhough the population has doubled and the building has been a series of eateries.

Mudgee railway was the life blood of the town. I remember catching the 'milk run' train to Sydney. The train was an old 'puffing billy' . In winter the train men would slide along the corridors, tin boxes filled with sand that had been sitting with the engine and were very hot. They would cover the boxes with sacking and we would take off our shoes and keep warm. Sadly no trains come to Mudgee now eventhough the population has doubled and the building has been a series of eateries.

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