Van Gogh 2017 Exhibition in National Gallery of Victoria

Van Gogh and the Seasons, a new exhibition at the NGV in Melbourne, features 49 works from throughout the artist’s career. Ranging from sketches to colourful oil paintings, the works vividly illustrate Vincent van Gogh’s passion for nature and the development of his fascination with colour. Here are a selection of the works on display
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SUMMER: Still life with wildflowers and carnations (summer 1887) - When Van Gogh was in Paris in the summer of 1887, he painted about 35 flower pictures, including this work featuring seasonal blooms. Its high-keyed colour contrasts reveal the results of his two-year quest for chromatic brilliance.   Photograph: private collection

Van Gogh at the National Gallery of Victoria – in pictures

SUMMER: Still life with wildflowers and carnations (summer 1887) - When Van Gogh was in Paris in the summer of 1887, he painted about 35 flower pictures, including this work featuring seasonal blooms. Its high-keyed colour contrasts reveal the results of his two-year quest for chromatic brilliance. Photograph: private collection

The 49 works of Van Gogh and the Seasons vividly illustrate the artist’s passion for nature and the development of his fascination with colour

Van Gogh at the National Gallery of Victoria – in pictures

The 49 works of Van Gogh and the Seasons vividly illustrate the artist’s passion for nature and the development of his fascination with colour

WINTER: The parsonage garden in the snow (January 1885) - Oil on canvas on wood panel. This winter scene of the garden of the parsonage at Nuenen, where Van Gogh lived with his parents for two years, was painted during a period of tension. He felt unwelcome and was frustrated at not being able to paint out of doors. This atmospheric piece is a view from a room on the first floor.  Photograph: Hammer Museum, Los Angeles

Van Gogh at the National Gallery of Victoria – in pictures

WINTER: The parsonage garden in the snow (January 1885) - Oil on canvas on wood panel. This winter scene of the garden of the parsonage at Nuenen, where Van Gogh lived with his parents for two years, was painted during a period of tension. He felt unwelcome and was frustrated at not being able to paint out of doors. This atmospheric piece is a view from a room on the first floor. Photograph: Hammer Museum, Los Angeles

WINTER: The parsonage garden at Nuenen in winter (mid-March 1884) - Pen and brown ink with white heightening. The six drawings of the garden and surrounds of his father’s parsonage that Van Gogh made in the winter of 1884 are quite large, highly finished, richly atmospheric. The old gnarly trees have a tremendous sense of life and energy, despite being leafless around mid-March.  Photograph: Rázsó András/Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest

Van Gogh at the National Gallery of Victoria – in pictures

WINTER: The parsonage garden at Nuenen in winter (mid-March 1884) - Pen and brown ink with white heightening. The six drawings of the garden and surrounds of his father’s parsonage that Van Gogh made in the winter of 1884 are quite large, highly finished, richly atmospheric. The old gnarly trees have a tremendous sense of life and energy, despite being leafless around mid-March. Photograph: Rázsó András/Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest

AUTUMN: Avenue of poplars in autumn (late October 1884) - Oil on canvas on wood panel. Neunen. Van Gogh’s painting illustrates stanzas from a melancholic poem, Tristement (‘sadly’) by a French poet, François Coppée, which expresses a widow’s grief. It is testament to the breadth of his interests that he would embrace contemporary French poetry as a source of inspiration for his art.  Photograph: Maurice Tromp/Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam

Van Gogh at the National Gallery of Victoria – in pictures

AUTUMN: Avenue of poplars in autumn (late October 1884) - Oil on canvas on wood panel. Neunen. Van Gogh’s painting illustrates stanzas from a melancholic poem, Tristement (‘sadly’) by a French poet, François Coppée, which expresses a widow’s grief. It is testament to the breadth of his interests that he would embrace contemporary French poetry as a source of inspiration for his art. Photograph: Maurice Tromp/Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam

SPRING: The garden of the asylum at Saint-Rémy (May 1889) - Oil on canvas. In May 1889, after several periods of treatment in the Arles hospital, Van Gogh admitted himself to the Saint-Paul de Mausole asylum in Saint-Rémy-de-Provence. Van Gogh here depicted a shaded pathway running along the outside of the north wing of the men’s quarters in the asylum, where he had been allowed to establish a studio.  Photograph: Rik Klein Gotink/Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo, the Netherlands

Van Gogh at the National Gallery of Victoria – in pictures

SPRING: The garden of the asylum at Saint-Rémy (May 1889) - Oil on canvas. In May 1889, after several periods of treatment in the Arles hospital, Van Gogh admitted himself to the Saint-Paul de Mausole asylum in Saint-Rémy-de-Provence. Van Gogh here depicted a shaded pathway running along the outside of the north wing of the men’s quarters in the asylum, where he had been allowed to establish a studio. Photograph: Rik Klein Gotink/Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo, the Netherlands

SPRING: Tree trunks in the grass (late April 1890) - Oil on canvas. In April 1890 Van Gogh was still at the Saint-Paul de Mausole asylum in Saint-Rémy, where for the previous month he had been in deep psychological crisis, unable to cope with the outside world. This landscape is thought to be the first painting he attempted once he was well enough to venture from his room. He depicts the base of a forked pine tree.  Photograph: Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo, the Netherlands

Van Gogh at the National Gallery of Victoria – in pictures

SPRING: Tree trunks in the grass (late April 1890) - Oil on canvas. In April 1890 Van Gogh was still at the Saint-Paul de Mausole asylum in Saint-Rémy, where for the previous month he had been in deep psychological crisis, unable to cope with the outside world. This landscape is thought to be the first painting he attempted once he was well enough to venture from his room. He depicts the base of a forked pine tree. Photograph: Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo, the Netherlands

SUMMER: Wheatfield (1888) - For two weeks in June of 1888, Van Gogh was engrossed with drawing and painting the golden wheatfields around Arles. As he wrote to Émile Bernard at this time, ‘yearnings for that infinite of which the Sower, the sheaf, are the symbols, still enchant me as before’. Although Van Gogh would have considered Wheatfield to be a study, he meticulously planned its composition.  Photograph: Honolulu Museum of Art, Hawaii

Van Gogh at the National Gallery of Victoria – in pictures

SUMMER: Wheatfield (1888) - For two weeks in June of 1888, Van Gogh was engrossed with drawing and painting the golden wheatfields around Arles. As he wrote to Émile Bernard at this time, ‘yearnings for that infinite of which the Sower, the sheaf, are the symbols, still enchant me as before’. Although Van Gogh would have considered Wheatfield to be a study, he meticulously planned its composition. Photograph: Honolulu Museum of Art, Hawaii

SPRING: Orchard bordered by cypresses (April 1888) - Oil on canvas. Van Gogh was captivated by fleeting moments of great beauty seen in nature. As the winter of 1888 thawed and spring blossoms emerged, he worked feverishly to complete a series of paintings of orchards near Arles before the weather turned.  Photograph: Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo, the Netherlands

Van Gogh at the National Gallery of Victoria – in pictures

SPRING: Orchard bordered by cypresses (April 1888) - Oil on canvas. Van Gogh was captivated by fleeting moments of great beauty seen in nature. As the winter of 1888 thawed and spring blossoms emerged, he worked feverishly to complete a series of paintings of orchards near Arles before the weather turned. Photograph: Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo, the Netherlands

AUTUMN: Pine trees at sunset (December 1889) - Oil on canvas. Only six months before his death, Van Gogh painted this stand of blasted pine trees, ravaged by storms, during his stay in the Saint-Rémy hospital. He made 20 paintings and sketches of the pine trees in and around the asylum.  Photograph: Kröller-Müller Museum - Rik Kl/Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo, the Netherlands

Van Gogh at the National Gallery of Victoria – in pictures

AUTUMN: Pine trees at sunset (December 1889) - Oil on canvas. Only six months before his death, Van Gogh painted this stand of blasted pine trees, ravaged by storms, during his stay in the Saint-Rémy hospital. He made 20 paintings and sketches of the pine trees in and around the asylum. Photograph: Kröller-Müller Museum - Rik Kl/Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo, the Netherlands

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