Built as part of Hobart’s post-fire reconstruction boom in the late 1960s, this home by McGlashan and Everist runs parallel to their most renowned work – Heidi II. Comprising a series of modest living platforms stepping down a steep site, its connection to the outdoors has left an enduring mark on its occupants.

Built as part of Hobart’s post-fire reconstruction boom in the late 1960s, this home by McGlashan and Everist runs parallel to their most renowned work – Heidi II. Comprising a series of modest living platforms stepping down a steep site, its connection to the outdoors has left an enduring mark on its occupants.

Built as part of Hobart’s post-fire reconstruction boom in the late 1960s, this home by McGlashan and Everist runs parallel to their most renowned work – Heidi II. Comprising a series of modest living platforms stepping down a steep site, its connection to the outdoors has left an enduring mark on its occupants.

Built as part of Hobart’s post-fire reconstruction boom in the late 1960s, this home by McGlashan and Everist runs parallel to their most renowned work – Heidi II. Comprising a series of modest living platforms stepping down a steep site, its connection to the outdoors has left an enduring mark on its occupants.

James Sprent map of Tasmania in 1859 published by J Walch & Sons, Hobart Town

James Sprent map of Tasmania in 1859 published by J Walch & Sons, Hobart Town

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