Australian Plants and Trees

magda reardon
Due to the wide range of different environments and plant communities, the native flora of Australia is the most diverse and varied in the world, growing in tropical, rainforest, stony inland deserts, alpine meadows and sandy heathlands. It has been estimated there are about 20,000 to 25,000 different plants native to Australia
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Common Appleberry (Billardiera scandens). is a small shrub or twining plant which occurs in forests in the coastal and tableland areas of all states and territories in Australia, apart from the Northern Territory and Western Australia. The plant consists of a single or paired yellow flowers, which are attached to a hairy drooping peduncle. In summer it produces oblong berries up to 30 mm long, initially green in color and covered in fine hair - similar to a tiny kiwifruit in appearance

Common Appleberry (Billardiera scandens). is a small shrub or twining plant which occurs in forests in the coastal and tableland areas of all states and territories in Australia, apart from the Northern Territory and Western Australia. The plant consists of a single or paired yellow flowers, which are attached to a hairy drooping peduncle. In summer it produces oblong berries up to 30 mm long, initially green in color and covered in fine hair - similar to a tiny kiwifruit in appearance

Eremaea asterocarpa, commonly known as rusty Eremaea, is a plat in the myrtle family, Myrtaceae and is endemic to south-west of Western Australia. It is a shrub with broad, flat leaves, and orange colored flowers in late winter or spring

Eremaea asterocarpa, commonly known as rusty Eremaea, is a plat in the myrtle family, Myrtaceae and is endemic to south-west of Western Australia. It is a shrub with broad, flat leaves, and orange colored flowers in late winter or spring

Blechnum wattsii or the hard water fern is a common fern growing in rainforest and pen forest. Often seen near creeks in much of south eastern Australia

Blechnum wattsii or the hard water fern is a common fern growing in rainforest and pen forest. Often seen near creeks in much of south eastern Australia

Athrotaxis selaginoides is a species of Athrotaxis, endemic to Tasmania in Australia, where it grows at 400-1,120 m altitude. In its habitat in the mountains, snow in winter is very usual. It is often called King Billy Pine or King William Pine, although it is not a true pine. It is an evergreen coniferous tree growing to 20-30 m tall with a trunk up to 1.5 m diameter

Athrotaxis selaginoides is a species of Athrotaxis, endemic to Tasmania in Australia, where it grows at 400-1,120 m altitude. In its habitat in the mountains, snow in winter is very usual. It is often called King Billy Pine or King William Pine, although it is not a true pine. It is an evergreen coniferous tree growing to 20-30 m tall with a trunk up to 1.5 m diameter

Anopterus glandulosus, commonly known as native laurel or Tasmanian laurel, is a species of shrub or small tree endemic to south and south western Tasmania. A. glandulosus is widespread in the moist understoreys of Tasmanian temperate rainforests and wet sclerophyll forests from sea level to mountainous regions below 1,200 metres (3,937 ft) above sea level

Anopterus glandulosus, commonly known as native laurel or Tasmanian laurel, is a species of shrub or small tree endemic to south and south western Tasmania. A. glandulosus is widespread in the moist understoreys of Tasmanian temperate rainforests and wet sclerophyll forests from sea level to mountainous regions below 1,200 metres (3,937 ft) above sea level

Diploglottis australis, known as the native tamarind, is a well known rainforest tree of eastern Australia. It is easily identifies by the large sausage shaped leaflets, The tree is medium to large, with long and broad leaves. It can reach a height of over 35 metres tall and a trunk diameter of 75 cm. The native tamarind grows in a variety of different rainforests, on basaltic and rich alluvial soils

Diploglottis australis, known as the native tamarind, is a well known rainforest tree of eastern Australia. It is easily identifies by the large sausage shaped leaflets, The tree is medium to large, with long and broad leaves. It can reach a height of over 35 metres tall and a trunk diameter of 75 cm. The native tamarind grows in a variety of different rainforests, on basaltic and rich alluvial soils

Isopogon formosus or Rose cone flower is a shrub that is endemic to areas near Albany and Esperance n Western Australia. It occurs naturally in heathland and woodland areas. It has an erect or bushy form and is usually between 1.5 and 2 metres high. YThe pink flowers appear from mid winter to early summer. Rounded  "drumsticks" containing the seeds appear later, formed from the old flower parts. The plants leaves are divided, narrow, terete and about 5 cm long

Isopogon formosus or Rose cone flower is a shrub that is endemic to areas near Albany and Esperance n Western Australia. It occurs naturally in heathland and woodland areas. It has an erect or bushy form and is usually between 1.5 and 2 metres high. YThe pink flowers appear from mid winter to early summer. Rounded "drumsticks" containing the seeds appear later, formed from the old flower parts. The plants leaves are divided, narrow, terete and about 5 cm long

Isopogon anemonifolius is a shrub that is endemic to eastern New South Wales in Australia. It occurs naturally in woodland, open forest and heathland on sandstone soils. Its height usually ranges between 0.5 and 2 metres, generally being smaller in exposed heathland. Yellow flowers appear during late spring or early summer and are displayed prominently. They are followed by gray cone-like drumsticks, the small hairy seeds found in the old flower parts

Isopogon anemonifolius is a shrub that is endemic to eastern New South Wales in Australia. It occurs naturally in woodland, open forest and heathland on sandstone soils. Its height usually ranges between 0.5 and 2 metres, generally being smaller in exposed heathland. Yellow flowers appear during late spring or early summer and are displayed prominently. They are followed by gray cone-like drumsticks, the small hairy seeds found in the old flower parts

Isopogon latifolius is a shrub that is endemic to the southwest botanical province of Western Australia

Isopogon latifolius is a shrub that is endemic to the southwest botanical province of Western Australia

Hovea longifolia is a member of the Fabacceae (pea) family. This native pea develops into an upright, medium shrub. The leaves are linear to oblong, dark green and paler beneath. In spring, bluish-purple flowers appear in clusters of two or three along the branchlets. Each pod that follows the flowers contain two hard-coated seeds. When the pods ripen they split rapidly and shoot out the seeds for some distance. Hovea longifolia occurs throughout New South Wales as well as Queensland

Hovea longifolia is a member of the Fabacceae (pea) family. This native pea develops into an upright, medium shrub. The leaves are linear to oblong, dark green and paler beneath. In spring, bluish-purple flowers appear in clusters of two or three along the branchlets. Each pod that follows the flowers contain two hard-coated seeds. When the pods ripen they split rapidly and shoot out the seeds for some distance. Hovea longifolia occurs throughout New South Wales as well as Queensland

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