Birds in My Aussie Yard.

I live in Sydney, Australia, on bush. We have the most amazing bird life here. Quite a few will hand feed from us, even though they are wild. Others stop by for a drink or to look at my birds in their aviaries. We are forever rescuing birds and their offspring.
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Australian Wood Duck - These ducks are plentiful around the neighbourhood, it helps that we are on a creek. When we don't clean our pool much during winter they often land and make it a pit stop. A bit messy when there are numbers of them, they are still delightful to see waddling along and foraging for food. Their babies are gorgeous, quickly waddling along behind mum/dad. They love various grasses and they are great at eating the dreaded clover in your lawn.

Australian Wood Duck - These ducks are plentiful around the neighbourhood, it helps that we are on a creek. When we don't clean our pool much during winter they often land and make it a pit stop. A bit messy when there are numbers of them, they are still delightful to see waddling along and foraging for food. Their babies are gorgeous, quickly waddling along behind mum/dad. They love various grasses and they are great at eating the dreaded clover in your lawn.

Magpie - One of the cheekiest birds around. They eat insects, lizards, small creatures and adapt to their environment. Very loving family units and the young are a bit more brown coloured than black at first. We have fed several generations of one family. Aggressively territorial, they are known to swoop/divebomb humans and other animals in spring near their nest. Highly intelligent, they are good imitators. .

Magpie - One of the cheekiest birds around. They eat insects, lizards, small creatures and adapt to their environment. Very loving family units and the young are a bit more brown coloured than black at first. We have fed several generations of one family. Aggressively territorial, they are known to swoop/divebomb humans and other animals in spring near their nest. Highly intelligent, they are good imitators. .

Magpie Lark (Or Pee wee) - they have a very usual 'oowit' cry. Cheeky and very adaptable to its environment. They are highly territorial and are often seen 'hunting' much larger birds away from their nests. They like smaller insects and lizards but will eat our birds seed that has fallen from an aviary.

Magpie Lark (Or Pee wee) - they have a very usual 'oowit' cry. Cheeky and very adaptable to its environment. They are highly territorial and are often seen 'hunting' much larger birds away from their nests. They like smaller insects and lizards but will eat our birds seed that has fallen from an aviary.

Masked Lapwing (or Plovers as we call them) - Long legged, they are usually in pairs of mum and dad. Very territorial and make a screeching noise when disturbed. They are mostly ground dwelling birds and their babies are like fluffy balls on sticks. They have a spur they use to attack invaders. They pop by the back from time to time and we love to see them  with their fuzzy chicks.

Masked Lapwing (or Plovers as we call them) - Long legged, they are usually in pairs of mum and dad. Very territorial and make a screeching noise when disturbed. They are mostly ground dwelling birds and their babies are like fluffy balls on sticks. They have a spur they use to attack invaders. They pop by the back from time to time and we love to see them with their fuzzy chicks.

The Lori's are not impressed at the Kookaburra hogging what they think is theirs - the bird bath. They aren't messing with the Kooka, though.

The Lori's are not impressed at the Kookaburra hogging what they think is theirs - the bird bath. They aren't messing with the Kooka, though.

Yellow Tailed Black Cockatoo - there are other varieties of Black Cockatoo, but this is the one we get here. We don't get these guys a lot, but they are beautiful with the most mournful cry. I love it when they come by. The love seeds and will use non-native plants to their advantage as well. They fly in flocks and it is a great pleasure when they grace us with their presence. A big, beautiful bird.

Yellow Tailed Black Cockatoo - there are other varieties of Black Cockatoo, but this is the one we get here. We don't get these guys a lot, but they are beautiful with the most mournful cry. I love it when they come by. The love seeds and will use non-native plants to their advantage as well. They fly in flocks and it is a great pleasure when they grace us with their presence. A big, beautiful bird.

This is a Corella - the short-beaked variety. There is also a long-beaked Corella, but we don't get them here. We don't get these guys a lot either, but they are characters when they do drop on by and are very similar to the Sulphur Crested Cockatoo - prolific everywhere. They like to forage on the ground as well as up in trees. They can be quite the sight when up in a tree with hundreds of them staring down at you. They love their seeds.

This is a Corella - the short-beaked variety. There is also a long-beaked Corella, but we don't get them here. We don't get these guys a lot either, but they are characters when they do drop on by and are very similar to the Sulphur Crested Cockatoo - prolific everywhere. They like to forage on the ground as well as up in trees. They can be quite the sight when up in a tree with hundreds of them staring down at you. They love their seeds.

Another striking Aussie native we get here. The Eastern Rosella. The males and females are quite similar, although the female can be more dull. This picture shows them in Wattle. They fly in in a flock, stay on the Grevillea, especially the Sandra Gordon, and then take off. They like to forage on the ground as well as in nectar/seed producing plants. I always find them to be quiet, even in a flock, and quite shy. They never stay long here before they are on their way again.

Another striking Aussie native we get here. The Eastern Rosella. The males and females are quite similar, although the female can be more dull. This picture shows them in Wattle. They fly in in a flock, stay on the Grevillea, especially the Sandra Gordon, and then take off. They like to forage on the ground as well as in nectar/seed producing plants. I always find them to be quiet, even in a flock, and quite shy. They never stay long here before they are on their way again.

The Kookaburra is such an Aussie icon. We like having them around as we get snakes here (but we are not anti-snake by any means) and they will spot one and kill it. They whip them and break a snake's back. Given the deadly nature of our snakes they are incredibly good at what they do and fast. They have the most amazing song and they are nicknamed the "Laughing Jackass" for their "laughing" call.  I remember hearing them in the Tarzan movies ad thinking "uh, no. Australia, not Africa."

The Kookaburra is such an Aussie icon. We like having them around as we get snakes here (but we are not anti-snake by any means) and they will spot one and kill it. They whip them and break a snake's back. Given the deadly nature of our snakes they are incredibly good at what they do and fast. They have the most amazing song and they are nicknamed the "Laughing Jackass" for their "laughing" call. I remember hearing them in the Tarzan movies ad thinking "uh, no. Australia, not Africa."

The Noisy Miner. What they lack in the looks department, compared to our beautiful parrots, they more than make up for in attitude and bravery.These birds have such an attitude and they are incredibly territorial. They love Grevilleas, Banksia, and any other plants that are rich in nectar. They also like a juicy spider added to their diet. And they aren't called noisy for nothing - if there is a potential danger they let the world know...as a group.

The Noisy Miner. What they lack in the looks department, compared to our beautiful parrots, they more than make up for in attitude and bravery.These birds have such an attitude and they are incredibly territorial. They love Grevilleas, Banksia, and any other plants that are rich in nectar. They also like a juicy spider added to their diet. And they aren't called noisy for nothing - if there is a potential danger they let the world know...as a group.

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