A Fuzzy Wuzzy Angel assists a wounded Australian soldier, Papua New Guinea, 1942.The Fuzzy Wuzzy Angels was the name given by Australian troops to a group of Papua New Guinean people who, during WW2, assisted and escorted injured Australian troops down the Kokoda trail. Fuzzy-Wuzzy was a British 19th century term referring to the Hadendoa warriors of the Sudan and their elaborate butter-matted hairstyles. The Fuzzy Wuzzy Angels were named for both their frizzy hair and helpful role.

A blinded Australian soldier (Private George Whittington) is guided to a field hospital away from the battlefront by a Papuan native (Raphael Oimbari). Buna, Northern Province, Papua New Guinea. Christmas Day, Photo by George Silk

A Bren gun team of 2/8th Australian Infantry Battalion support an attack on Mount Shiburangu, near Wewak in Papua New Guinea.

HU A Bren gun team of Australian Infantry Battalion support an attack on Mount Shiburangu near Wewak in Papua New Guinea.

26 August 1942 - Battle of Milne Bay begins - Japanese forces land and launch a full-scale assault on Australian base near the eastern tip of New Guinea - These Australian soldiers are at Milne Bay in Papua New Guinea. The New Guinea Campaign (1942-1945) was a battlefield during World War II. At The Battle of Milne Bay, the Americans and Australians were defending against the Japanese.

Australian troops at Milne Bay, Papua. The Australian army was the first to inflict defeat on the Imperial Japanese Army during World War II at the Battle of Milne Bay of August–September

New Guinea 1943-1944, Australian Army

The Finisterre Range campaign, also known as the Ramu Valley–Finisterre Range campaign, was a series of actions in the New Guinea campaign of World War II. Several actions in the campaign are sometimes known collectively as the Battle of Shaggy Ridge

AUG 24 1943 Facing a Japanese night attack on New Guinea Papuan natives, known affectionately to the Australians as ‘Fuzzy-Wuzzy angels’, carry supplies during the fighting near Wau in New Guinea. The Australian forces owed much to native carriers who kept the forward troops supplied and helped to evacuate the wounded.

August Facing a Japanese night attack on New Guinea

An Australian P-40 Kittyhawk prepares to land at Gili-Gili Airfield, Papua New Guinea, in 1942. The Bofors AA gun in the foreground is manned by members of the 2/9th Light Anti-Aircraft Battery, Royal Australian Artillery. (AWM)

Milne Bay, Papua, September a Bofors gun position manned by the Light Anti-Aircraft Battery, Royal Australian Artillery, at Gili-Gili airfield. In the background a Kittyhawk is about to land.

Japanese soldiers taken as prisoners by Australian forces at Ulebilum Ridge during the New Guinea Campaign are interrogated by an Australian soldier as three armed Papuan scouts stand guard (July 1945).

WWII --- Japanese soldiers are interrogated by an Australian soldier, with local island natives standing guard (Papua New Guinea - July

Unsung Heroes of the Kokoda Campaign - the Wuzzy Fuzzy Angels!  The "fuzzy wuzzy" angels acted as bearers for the Australian and other Allied troops, carrying supplies and wounded on the Kokoda Trail during the fighting against the Japanese.

Unsung Heroes of the Kokoda Campaign - the Wuzzy Fuzzy Angels! The "fuzzy wuzzy" angels acted as bearers for the Australian and other Allied troops, carrying supplies and wounded on the Kokoda Trail during the fighting against the Japanese.

Papuan soldiers of the Papuan Infantry Battalion (PIB) are drilled at Port Moresby after the Battalion was raised on 27 May 1940 by the Australian Army to help combat the Japanese occupation of New Guinea. Port Moresby, Territory of Papua (now, Papua New Guinea). April 1941.

Out of the Papua New Guineans who served during World War Two as carriers & laborers for both the allied & axis forces, 800 served as local militia with the Papuan Infantry Battalion & the Royal Papua Constabulary.


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