One problem with fighting enemies who are on horseback is that it’s hard to get a solid blow in when your opponent is higher than you. One invention that was used to help even the playing field was the fearsome man catcher.The man catcher consists of a hoop with spikes around the inside. Man catchers were used to snag riders around the neck and drag them off of their horses, making them easier to kill. The device saw its fair share of use during the wars of the 1500s.

One problem with fighting enemies who are on horseback is that it’s hard to get a solid blow in when your opponent is higher than you. One invention that was used to help even the playing field was the fearsome man catcher.The man catcher consists of a hoop with spikes around the inside. Man catchers were used to snag riders around the neck and drag them off of their horses, making them easier to kill. The device saw its fair share of use during the wars of the 1500s.

Saber (Tulwar) with Scabbard Date: blade, dated 1673; hilt, 19th century Culture: Indian Medium: Steel, silver, diamonds, enamel, leather Dimensions: Blade length, 31 1/2 in. (80.01 cm) Classification: Swords Credit Line: Bequest of George C. Stone, 1935 Accession Number: 36.25.1591a, b

Saber (Tulwar) with Scabbard Date: blade, dated 1673; hilt, 19th century Culture: Indian Medium: Steel, silver, diamonds, enamel, leather Dimensions: Blade length, 31 1/2 in. (80.01 cm) Classification: Swords Credit Line: Bequest of George C. Stone, 1935 Accession Number: 36.25.1591a, b

The yatagan was popular throughout the Ottoman Empire. Single-edged blade that curves slightly inward and by a hilt with no guard and two flared wings at the pommel. Date: dated 1802–3 Culture:  Anatolian or Balkan Medium: Steel, silver, gold, coral. Dimensions: Weight, 3 lb. 8 oz.; Weight without scabbard, 1 lb. 14 oz.; Length without scabbard 29 in. (73.66 cm) Length of blade 23 1/8 in.; Greatest width 2 1/4 in.; Greatest width of blade 1 1/4 in.

The yatagan was popular throughout the Ottoman Empire. Single-edged blade that curves slightly inward and by a hilt with no guard and two flared wings at the pommel. Date: dated 1802–3 Culture: Anatolian or Balkan Medium: Steel, silver, gold, coral. Dimensions: Weight, 3 lb. 8 oz.; Weight without scabbard, 1 lb. 14 oz.; Length without scabbard 29 in. (73.66 cm) Length of blade 23 1/8 in.; Greatest width 2 1/4 in.; Greatest width of blade 1 1/4 in.

Ceremonial Dagger (Bichwa), 17th century. South Indian, Thanjavur. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Purchase, Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Gift, 2014 (2014.190) | This work is featured in our Arms and Armor Notable Acquisitions 2003–2014 exhibition on view through December 6, 2015. #sword

Ceremonial Dagger (Bichwa), 17th century. South Indian, Thanjavur. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Purchase, Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Gift, 2014 (2014.190) | This work is featured in our Arms and Armor Notable Acquisitions 2003–2014 exhibition on view through December 6, 2015. #sword

Armadura de tres cuartos  que perteneció a Enrique VIII de Inglaterra - C 1545

Armadura de tres cuartos que perteneció a Enrique VIII de Inglaterra - C 1545

Golden Roman helmet | Golden Roman helmet found near ancient city of Sirmium, nowadays city of Sremska Mitrovica in Serbia. Discovered in 1955 it was dated to around 4th century AD. It is considered that this helmet was manufactured in the imperial workshop in Sirmium.

Golden Roman helmet | Golden Roman helmet found near ancient city of Sirmium, nowadays city of Sremska Mitrovica in Serbia. Discovered in 1955 it was dated to around 4th century AD. It is considered that this helmet was manufactured in the imperial workshop in Sirmium.

Armour for horse and man, and field armour    Armour for horse and man: Italy (probably Milan), ~1565.  Field Armour: Italy, ~1575.

Armour for horse and man, and field armour Armour for horse and man: Italy (probably Milan), ~1565. Field Armour: Italy, ~1575.

The Ishtar Gate was the eighth gate to the inner city of Babylon. It was constructed in about 575 BC, and edicated to the Babylonian goddess Ishtar,

The Ishtar Gate was the eighth gate to the inner city of Babylon. It was constructed in about 575 BC, and edicated to the Babylonian goddess Ishtar,

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