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Celebrating  :: Hand-drawn typeface for the Aarhus City Hall (Denmark), 1937 #ArneJacobsen #DesignLetters  via @JennSk8s

Celebrating :: Hand-drawn typeface for the Aarhus City Hall (Denmark), 1937 #ArneJacobsen #DesignLetters via @JennSk8s

Saffran typeface from #Italy : http://www.c-a-s-t.com/saffran/index.html. @thelettergram , , #FontoftheYear.  via @_superness

Superness on

Saffran typeface from #Italy : http://www.c-a-s-t.com/saffran/index.html. @thelettergram , , #FontoftheYear. via @_superness

Celebrate the year in fonts. Tomorrow's  is #FontoftheYear with a round up of the best designs of #2015  via @DesignMuseum

Design Museum on

Celebrate the year in fonts. Tomorrow's is #FontoftheYear with a round up of the best designs of #2015 via @DesignMuseum

Canada 150 typeface supports the country's two official language and indigenous languages.

Most inclusive font? Canada 150 supports English, French, indigenous languages

Canada 150 typeface supports the country's two official language and indigenous languages.

29LT Zeyn: Arabic + Latin created simultaneously by @29Letters. 2015 #fontoftheyear  - keep 'em coming!  via @DesignMuseum

Design Museum on

29LT Zeyn: Arabic + Latin created simultaneously by @29Letters. 2015 #fontoftheyear - keep 'em coming! via @DesignMuseum

The Eric Gill Series by @Monotype http://www.monotype.com/ericgillseries  #FontoftheYear   via @uberbabygraphic

Zoë Typelark on

The Eric Gill Series by @Monotype http://www.monotype.com/ericgillseries #FontoftheYear via @uberbabygraphic

Design Museum Rocks!   #FontoftheYear  via @tonyplcc

Tony Pritchard on

Design Museum Rocks! #FontoftheYear via @tonyplcc

also adore @fontsmith #fsbrabo (& the specimen by @thecounterpress)! #fontoftheyear via @typographHer

nicole a phillips on

also adore @fontsmith #fsbrabo (& the specimen by @thecounterpress)! #fontoftheyear via @typographHer

Gothic / black-letter script evolved from Carolingian in the later middle ages, circa 1200 AD, became the dominant handwriting from the 12C until the Italian Renaissance (1400–1600 AD). It was not as clear as Carolingian, but was narrower, darker & denser. The dot above the i was added to differentiate it from the similar strokes of the n, m, & u. The u was created as separate from the v, which had been used for both sounds. Compact handwriting saved space, as parchment was expensive...

Gothic / black-letter script evolved from Carolingian in the later middle ages, circa 1200 AD, became the dominant handwriting from the 12C until the Italian Renaissance (1400–1600 AD). It was not as clear as Carolingian, but was narrower, darker & denser. The dot above the i was added to differentiate it from the similar strokes of the n, m, & u. The u was created as separate from the v, which had been used for both sounds. Compact handwriting saved space, as parchment was expensive...

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