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Athabascan group at Porcupine River, NWT - no date

Athabascan group at Porcupine River, NWT - no date

Alaska ft Yukon ATHABASCAN Indian and Papoose Stereoview KSCAM268 | eBay

Alaska ~ FT YUKON ~ Athabascan Indian And Papoose Stereoview kscam268

Alaska ft Yukon ATHABASCAN Indian and Papoose Stereoview KSCAM268 | eBay

Stephen Standing Bear (Oglala) by Joseph A. Zimmerman, Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota, 1930

Stephen Standing Bear (Oglala) by Joseph A. Zimmerman, Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota, 1930

Athabascan Summer Camp near the Tanana River in Alaska - no date

Athabascan Summer Camp near the Tanana River in Alaska - no date

"Pueblo Indian of Taos". Taken at Taos, New Mexico, Elizabeth Town at the Feast of San Geronimo at Taos, September 30, 1871. - National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

"Pueblo Indian of Taos". Taken at Taos, New Mexico, Elizabeth Town at the Feast of San Geronimo at Taos, September 30, 1871. - National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

Zintka Lanuni "Lost Bird", orphaned in the Battle of Wounded Knee (29-12-1890) and taken away from her Native American tribe by General Leonard Wright Colby. (No date - Photographer unknown) (Photoshopped)

Zintka Lanuni "Lost Bird", orphaned in the Battle of Wounded Knee (29-12-1890) and taken away from her Native American tribe by General Leonard Wright Colby. (No date - Photographer unknown) (Photoshopped)

The Five Civilized Tribes were the five Native American nations—the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, and Seminole—that were considered civilized by Anglo-European settlers during the colonial and early federal period because they adopted many of the colonists' customs and had generally good relations with their neighbors.

The Five Civilized Tribes were the five Native American nations—the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, and Seminole—that were considered civilized by Anglo-European settlers during the colonial and early federal period because they adopted many of the colonists' customs and had generally good relations with their neighbors.

Sacred Feathers...Feathers in hair for Native Americans had a spiritual meaning. They were worn by Native American Chiefs to symbolize their communication with the Spirit, and to show off their divine wisdom. Feathers also represented the power of the thunder gods, along with the power of air and wind. Sometime feathers were representative of courage during a battle or a successful hunt.

Sacred Feathers...Feathers in hair for Native Americans had a spiritual meaning. They were worn by Native American Chiefs to symbolize their communication with the Spirit, and to show off their divine wisdom. Feathers also represented the power of the thunder gods, along with the power of air and wind. Sometime feathers were representative of courage during a battle or a successful hunt.

Indian Tom saved three pioneer children during the King County War of 1855/1856, near Brannan Park, c. 1914. He took them down the river to another Indian who took them to Seattle

Indian Tom saved three pioneer children during the King County War of 1855/1856, near Brannan Park, c. 1914. He took them down the river to another Indian who took them to Seattle