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Gigue (Baroque Dance) - The gigue (French pronunciation: ​[ʒiɡ]) or giga (Italian: [ˈdʒiːɡa]) is a lively baroque dance originating from the British jig. It was imported into France in the mid-17th century[2] and usually appears at the end of a suite. The gigue was probably never a court dance, but it was danced by nobility on social occasions and several court composers wrote gigues.[3]

Gigue (Baroque Dance) - The gigue (French pronunciation: ​[ʒiɡ]) or giga (Italian: [ˈdʒiːɡa]) is a lively baroque dance originating from the British jig. It was imported into France in the mid-17th century[2] and usually appears at the end of a suite. The gigue was probably never a court dance, but it was danced by nobility on social occasions and several court composers wrote gigues.[3]

Habits des nymphes de la suite d'Orithie du balet du Triomphe de l'Amour. Costume by Jean Berain père: a young woman wearing a feathered turban and embroidered jacket and skirt, dancing on a stage, 1681. Lully introduced the participation of women as professional dancers in this ballet.:

Habits des nymphes de la suite d'Orithie du balet du Triomphe de l'Amour. Costume by Jean Berain père: a young woman wearing a feathered turban and embroidered jacket and skirt, dancing on a stage, 1681. Lully introduced the participation of women as professional dancers in this ballet.:

The British Library -- The Elusive Dancing Master

The British Library -- The Elusive Dancing Master

Four game cards from a Cavagnole Game Bag and Pieces (Jeu de cavagnole), French, about 1750, watercolor and gouache on vellum. The illuminated scrolls on display in the exhibit put today’s cardboard bingo cards and chips to shame. The tiny numbered squares of vellum feature ornamental fountains; wine-drinking monkeys dressed in human clothes, playing backgammon; as well as the famed 18th-century rhinoceros Clara, who traveled Europe as a celebrity for 17 years.

Four game cards from a Cavagnole Game Bag and Pieces (Jeu de cavagnole), French, about 1750, watercolor and gouache on vellum. The illuminated scrolls on display in the exhibit put today’s cardboard bingo cards and chips to shame. The tiny numbered squares of vellum feature ornamental fountains; wine-drinking monkeys dressed in human clothes, playing backgammon; as well as the famed 18th-century rhinoceros Clara, who traveled Europe as a celebrity for 17 years.

H Beard Print Collection | Moitte, Alexandre | V&A  Photograph of a pen and ink drawing by Alexandre Moitte depicting six performers in full costume in Nicholas Dezède's opera Alcindor, Paris Opera, 1787. The names of the actors and dancers are written beneath each character. They appear to be: Monsieur Luis as Alcindor, Mademoiselle Elisbeuck as a Fairy, Mr Chevoir as Le Géni, Mademoiselle Luiglois, Monsieur Shiron as le grand prétre (high priest) and Mademoiselle Zachariu.

H Beard Print Collection

H Beard Print Collection | Moitte, Alexandre | V&A Photograph of a pen and ink drawing by Alexandre Moitte depicting six performers in full costume in Nicholas Dezède's opera Alcindor, Paris Opera, 1787. The names of the actors and dancers are written beneath each character. They appear to be: Monsieur Luis as Alcindor, Mademoiselle Elisbeuck as a Fairy, Mr Chevoir as Le Géni, Mademoiselle Luiglois, Monsieur Shiron as le grand prétre (high priest) and Mademoiselle Zachariu.

Cake-Walk or Cakewalk-- was a dance developed from the "Prize Walks" held in the late 19th century, generally at get-togethers on black slave plantations in the Southern United States. Alternative names for the original form of the dance were "chalkline-walk", and the "walk-around". At the conclusion of a performance of the original form of the dance in an exhibit at the 1876 Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia, an enormous cake was awarded to the winning couple. Thereafter it was…

Cake-Walk or Cakewalk-- was a dance developed from the "Prize Walks" held in the late 19th century, generally at get-togethers on black slave plantations in the Southern United States. Alternative names for the original form of the dance were "chalkline-walk", and the "walk-around". At the conclusion of a performance of the original form of the dance in an exhibit at the 1876 Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia, an enormous cake was awarded to the winning couple. Thereafter it was…

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