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This roundwood woodland classroom is made from western red cedar, sweet chestnut, hazel, limestone, clay and stone. Most of the materials came from within 200 yards of the building. More at www.naturalhomes.org/woodland-classroom.htm

This is one of nine homes each of which use different natural materials for their roof demonstrating the material's versatility, and in many cases longevity, up to 400 years. Find out about them at www.naturalhomes.org/natural-building-roof.htm

The cob arch in the middle of the garden is the entrance to a covered seating area and small cob guest house.

This is one of the natural buildings at Tinkers Bubble, a small off-grid woodland community on 40 acres (16 hectares) of land in rural Somerset, England. More including video at www.naturalhomes.org/tinkersbubble.htm

Huehuecoyotl, an ecovillage formed in 1982 by a troupe of itinerant actors called the Illuminated Elephants. The community became Mexico’s first Ecovillage, a concept based on permaculture design principles. Huehuecoyotl is located in the hills outside of Tepoztlán, about an hour outside of Mexico City.

This English cob home is from the Natural Homes Collection. It's just one of the many beautiful homes you can find on www.naturalhomes.org with video, books and links to the natural builder's websites. Find this and other cob homes at www.naturalhomes.org/cobhouses.htm

This beautiful Straw Bale Studio is in Oxford, MI, USA. It's a place to learn about natural building skills and sustainable living. The straw bale home has a thatched roof, earthen plasters with natural paints and uses solar electricity. Find something new every day on the Natural Homes Timeline http://naturalhomes.org/timeline.htm

This is the interior of one of the cob homes by Adam and Katie of Clayworks [www.clay-works.com]. Clay Works are based in the UK and supply beautiful clay plasters. More natural homes at www.naturalhomes.org/timeline.htm

This little beauty in Cornwall, England was built in 2005 by Adam and Katy of Clay Works [www.clay-works.com]. They used clay from the site, straw from the fields next door and aggregate from a quarry just 4 miles away. See more at www.naturalhomes.org/timeline/clayworks-cobcottage.htm