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Prohibition passed on Jan. 16, 1919, went into effect one year later, and ended in 1933. These photos of New York City speakeasies were published in 1933, "for a future that will want to know how New Yorkers of the ’20s lived."  See more: http://ti.me/1Im4plY  (Margaret Bourke-White—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)

Prohibition passed on Jan. 16, 1919, went into effect one year later, and ended in 1933. These photos of New York City speakeasies were published in 1933, "for a future that will want to know how New Yorkers of the ’20s lived." See more: http://ti.me/1Im4plY (Margaret Bourke-White—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)

Classic. Classic. Classic.  I still love this photo...I heard an interview on the radio about this woman 50 yrs later.  They did not know each other.

"C'est la vie"

Classic. Classic. Classic. I still love this photo...I heard an interview on the radio about this woman 50 yrs later. They did not know each other.

Un bar de Nueva York, la noche previa al comienzo de la prohibición del alcohol, 1920. / A bar in New York City, the night before the prohibition began,1920.

Un bar de Nueva York, la noche previa al comienzo de la prohibición del alcohol, 1920. / A bar in New York City, the night before the prohibition began,1920.

Miss America 1924

Miss America 1924

Historic Black and White Photos in Stunning Color - Miss America, 1924 (Image 13 of The styles sure were different back in the roaring twenties. Ruth Malcomson, who ran as Miss Philadelphia in won the Miss America crown over 82 other competitors.

A Polish man embraces an Allied soldier, kissing his cheek, after being liberated from a Nazi forced labor camp in Germany during World War II.

A Polish man embraces an Allied soldier, kissing his cheek, after being liberated from a Nazi forced labor camp in Germany during World War II.

In the early 1950s programs were started to issue dog-tags to children. There was concern that in the event of a surprise atomic attack it would be difficult to identify the millions of children killed while at school. The program never became as universal as hoped.

In the early 1950s programs were started to issue dog-tags to children. There was concern that in the event of a surprise atomic attack it would be difficult to identify the millions of children killed while at school. The program never became as universal as hoped.

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