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Dormant Volcano Poised To Destroy Rome... In 1,000 Years - Forbes

Dormant Volcano Poised To Destroy Rome... In 1,000 Years - Forbes

Roman bread from Pompeii, Italy. Pompeii was buried under a thick layer of volcanic ash by a catastrophic eruption of Vesuvius in 79 AD. The site of the town was rediscovered in 1748, and subsequent excavations revealed buildings and artefacts in a remarkably well preserved state.

Roman bread from Pompeii, Italy. Pompeii was buried under a thick layer of volcanic ash by a catastrophic eruption of Vesuvius in 79 AD. The site of the town was rediscovered in 1748, and subsequent excavations revealed buildings and artefacts in a remarkably well preserved state.

Frozen in time: An ash corpse crawls over bodies in Pompei, Italy. Photo by Trevor Keyler

Frozen in time: An ash corpse crawls over bodies in Pompei, Italy. Photo by Trevor Keyler

Student Data Binder for Tracking Progress in the Classroom FREE from The Curriculum Corner | editable forms

Student Data Binder Printables

Georgia's New Annual Benchmark Test:  GMAP

Georgia’s New Annual Benchmark Test: GMAP

Georgia's New Annual Benchmark Test: GMAP

pompeii garden of the fugitives. The city of Pompeii was an ancient Roman town-city near modern Naples in the Italian region of Campania, in the territory of the comune of Pompei. Pompeii along with Herculaneum and many villas in the surrounding area, were mostly destroyed and buried under 4 to 6 m (13 to 20 ft) of ash and pumice in the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD.

pompeii garden of the fugitives. The city of Pompeii was an ancient Roman town-city near modern Naples in the Italian region of Campania, in the territory of the comune of Pompei. Pompeii along with Herculaneum and many villas in the surrounding area, were mostly destroyed and buried under 4 to 6 m (13 to 20 ft) of ash and pumice in the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD.

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