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Debutante Ball - Every time I post one of these, they get a gazillion reblogs. So what the hell, here’s another one.

Debutante Ball - Every time I post one of these, they get a gazillion reblogs. So what the hell, here’s another one.

Several cotillions featured in issues of Ebony during the 1960s. Black coming-of-age balls #blackculture #cotillions

Several cotillions featured in issues of Ebony during the 1960s. Black coming-of-age balls #blackculture #cotillions

Langston Hughes, Charles S. Johnson, E. Franklin Frazier, Rudolph Fisher and Hubert Delany (brother of the Delany Sisters) overlooking St. Nicholas Avenue in Harlem in the 1920s.

Langston Hughes, Charles S. Johnson, E. Franklin Frazier, Rudolph Fisher and Hubert Delany (brother of the Delany Sisters) overlooking St. Nicholas Avenue in Harlem in the 1920s.

Fredi Washington refused to "pass" for white, at Hollywood's suggestion, and was therefore typecast as mixed race and never allowed a flourishing career. Her stance, however, made her an advocate among African Americans.

Fredi Washington refused to "pass" for white, at Hollywood's suggestion, and was therefore typecast as mixed race and never allowed a flourishing career. Her stance, however, made her an advocate among African Americans.

Francine Everett (April 13, 1915 – May 27, 1999) was an African-American actress and singer who is best known for her performances in race films, independently produced motion pictures with all-black casts that were created exclusively for distribution to cinemas that catered to African American audiences. She studied and acted with the Federal Theater in Harlem, which was sponsored by the Works Progress Administration.

Francine Everett (April 13, 1915 – May 27, 1999) was an African-American actress and singer who is best known for her performances in race films, independently produced motion pictures with all-black casts that were created exclusively for distribution to cinemas that catered to African American audiences. She studied and acted with the Federal Theater in Harlem, which was sponsored by the Works Progress Administration.

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