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The Olmec colossal heads are at least seventeen monumental stone representations of human heads sculpted from large basalt boulders. The heads date from at least before 900 BC and are a distinctive feature of the Olmec civilization of ancient Mesoamerica (Gulf Coast of Mexico). Believed by some  historians especially Dr. Ivan Van Sertima., " They came before Columbus" to be of images of African explorers that came to that area.

The Olmec colossal heads are at least seventeen monumental stone representations of human heads sculpted from large basalt boulders. The heads date from at least before 900 BC and are a distinctive feature of the Olmec civilization of ancient Mesoamerica (Gulf Coast of Mexico). Believed by some historians especially Dr. Ivan Van Sertima., " They came before Columbus" to be of images of African explorers that came to that area.

Head of a sheep, sandstone, 9 cm high, 11.5 cm wide; Mesopotamia, Uruk, E-anna, ca. 3300-2900 B.C., Staatliche Museen zu Berlin Vonderasiatiches Museum.   “  This head is part of large hoard called the Sammelfund. It was discovered in a courtyard used for animal sacrifices. This period is considered one of the most prosperous of Mesopotamian history. The largest section of the wall of Uruk, and many structures were built around 3000 B.C

Head of a sheep, sandstone, 9 cm high, 11.5 cm wide; Mesopotamia, Uruk, E-anna, ca. 3300-2900 B.C., Staatliche Museen zu Berlin Vonderasiatiches Museum. “ This head is part of large hoard called the Sammelfund. It was discovered in a courtyard used for animal sacrifices. This period is considered one of the most prosperous of Mesopotamian history. The largest section of the wall of Uruk, and many structures were built around 3000 B.C

Victory Stele at Narim-sin, Iraq, found in Iran 2254-2218BCE | Louvre Museum | Paris

Victory Stele at Narim-sin, Iraq, found in Iran 2254-2218BCE | Louvre Museum | Paris

tammuz:  Limestone head of a guard from the era of Xerxes I (485-465 BCE). The Achaemenid Empire ruled Persia and Mesopotamia with Babylon as its major imperial capital until Alexander the Great’s conquest of the Near East. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, NY.Photo by Babylon Chronicle

tammuz: Limestone head of a guard from the era of Xerxes I (485-465 BCE). The Achaemenid Empire ruled Persia and Mesopotamia with Babylon as its major imperial capital until Alexander the Great’s conquest of the Near East. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, NY.Photo by Babylon Chronicle

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