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Aplicações cem POR Cento dos 105 DICAS Patchwork

Aplicações cem POR Cento dos 105 DICAS Patchwork

Period Window Dressing Ideas from http://www.classicaladdiction.com/2011/12/more-period-window-dressing-ideas/

Period Window Dressing Ideas from http://www.classicaladdiction.com/2011/12/more-period-window-dressing-ideas/

A Pelmet is a decorative, stiffened valance, which may be flat or have stiffened sections or fancy shapes. A pelmet is always stiffened and interlined to avoid sagging and rippling. Welting and borders are often used to accentuate the shape of the pelmet. A pelmet can be used in combination with jabots, cascades, tails, swags, or flags.

A Pelmet is a decorative, stiffened valance, which may be flat or have stiffened sections or fancy shapes. A pelmet is always stiffened and interlined to avoid sagging and rippling. Welting and borders are often used to accentuate the shape of the pelmet. A pelmet can be used in combination with jabots, cascades, tails, swags, or flags.

DIY Roman Shades - no sew, and you use old blinds as a base. Sooo simple!

DIY Roman Shades - no sew, and you use old blinds as a base. Sooo simple!

How To Sew A Triangle Valance - Simple Sewing Projects | Simple Sewing Projects                                                                                                                                                      Más

How To Sew A Triangle Valance

How To Sew A Triangle Valance - Simple Sewing Projects | Simple Sewing Projects Más

Kit de higiene princesa floral

Kit de higiene princesa floral

Tissue

Making your own roman shade  	  		  Martha Stewart Living, Volume 151 June 2006    Fabric  Iron  Needle and thread  Disappearing-ink pen  Cotton strips (shade's width plus 3/4 inch by 4 3/4 inches)  1/4-inch dowels  2-by-1-inch wooden batten (cut to width of shade)  Two 2-by-3-inch swatches of fabric  Staple gun  Brass rings  Cord lock  Screw eyes  Shade lift cord  Cord condenser  Cord tassel

Make Your Own Roman Shades

Making your own roman shade Martha Stewart Living, Volume 151 June 2006 Fabric Iron Needle and thread Disappearing-ink pen Cotton strips (shade's width plus 3/4 inch by 4 3/4 inches) 1/4-inch dowels 2-by-1-inch wooden batten (cut to width of shade) Two 2-by-3-inch swatches of fabric Staple gun Brass rings Cord lock Screw eyes Shade lift cord Cord condenser Cord tassel

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