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Pah-Ute (Paiute) Indian group, near Cedar, Utah, in 1872. (Timothy O'Sullivan/National Archives and Records Administration)

Pah-Ute (Paiute) Indian group, near Cedar, Utah, in 1872. (Timothy O'Sullivan/National Archives and Records Administration)

Navajo boy.  Karl E. Moon & Co., c1906.  Miscellaneous Items in High Demand, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

Navajo boy. Karl E. Moon & Co., c1906. Miscellaneous Items in High Demand, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

a dramatic photograph of a Crow War Party. It was made in 1908 in Montana by Edward S. Curtis.  The photo illustrates Eight Crow Indians on horseback, silhouetted on the top of a hill. The man that is second from the left is pointing off into the distance.

a dramatic photograph of a Crow War Party. It was made in 1908 in Montana by Edward S. Curtis. The photo illustrates Eight Crow Indians on horseback, silhouetted on the top of a hill. The man that is second from the left is pointing off into the distance.

A photograph of a Potawatomi man. My Native American blood is of the Potawatomi.  The Potawatomi were part of a long-term alliance, called the Council of Three Fires, with the Ojibwe (Chippewa) and Odaawaa/Odawa (Ottawa). In the Council of Three Fires, the Potawatomi were considered the "youngest brother." The Potawatomi made their home near the Great Lakes Region.

A photograph of a Potawatomi man. My Native American blood is of the Potawatomi. The Potawatomi were part of a long-term alliance, called the Council of Three Fires, with the Ojibwe (Chippewa) and Odaawaa/Odawa (Ottawa). In the Council of Three Fires, the Potawatomi were considered the "youngest brother." The Potawatomi made their home near the Great Lakes Region.

Photo of Indian captive Olive Oatman, 1857. Source: Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University; Wikimedia Commons. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “Olive Oatman’s Rescue: A True Indian Captive Story.” http://blog.genealogybank.com/olive-oatmans-rescue-a-true-indian-captive-story.html

Photo of Indian captive Olive Oatman, 1857. Source: Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University; Wikimedia Commons. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “Olive Oatman’s Rescue: A True Indian Captive Story.” http://blog.genealogybank.com/olive-oatmans-rescue-a-true-indian-captive-story.html

One of the earliest photos showing a Native American with a wolf - unlike the myths created about wolves by settlers, Indians maintained a close and respectful relationship with wolves.

One of the earliest photos showing a Native American with a wolf - unlike the myths created about wolves by settlers, Indians maintained a close and respectful relationship with wolves.

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