Idiom of the day: New kid on the block. Meaning: Someone who is new in a place or organization.

Idiom of the day: New kid on the block. Meaning: Someone who is new in a place or organization.

British Vs American English: 100+ Differences Illustrated

British Vs American English: 100+ Differences Illustrated

British & American English, since none of these is my mother language I see that I have been mixing it up, confusing many people actually :P

Idiom of the day: Have the guts.  Meaning: To have enough courage to do something.  Example: I don’t have the guts to go bungee jumping.

Idiom of the day: Have the guts. Meaning: To have enough courage to do something. Example: I don’t have the guts to go bungee jumping.

"No spring chicken" is a person who is no longer young. Example: That actress is no spring chicken, but she does a pretty good job of playing a twenty-year-old girl.

"No spring chicken" is a person who is no longer young. Example: That actress is no spring chicken, but she does a pretty good job of playing a twenty-year-old girl.

Idiom of the day: Fender bender.  Meaning: A little car accident.  Example:  - I got into a car accident.  - Oh! You didn’t get hurt did you?  - No. It was just a fender bender.

Idiom of the day: Fender bender. Meaning: A little car accident. Example: - I got into a car accident. - Oh! You didn’t get hurt did you? - No. It was just a fender bender.

Idiom of the day: Touch-and-go. Meaning: Very uncertain or critical. Example: Things were touch-and-go at the office until a new manager was hired.

Idiom of the day: Touch-and-go. Meaning: Very uncertain or critical. Example: Things were touch-and-go at the office until a new manager was hired.

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