Pinterest • The world’s catalogue of ideas

Top Plants that Thrive in Clay

Clay soil can be tough for plants to thrive in, but not for these hardy plants! Choose from beautiful flowers that actually thrive in clay so you can enjoy a gorgeous garden or flowerbed. Our favorites include geranium, sunflower, hosta and coral bells.

Create an Easy-Care Shrub Garden

Rozanne Perennial Geranium 'Rozanne' gives you big flower power: It starts blooming in June and the show of sky blue flowers continues nonstop all the way to frost. This perennial makes a bold statement as it weaves through the garden. Name: Geranium 'Rozanne' Growing Conditions: Full sun to part shade and moist, well-drained soil Size: To 2 feet tall and 3 feet wide Zones: 4-8

Easy Groundcovers

Add a pop of color to grassy areas with bright pink Armeria. Learn more about groundcovers: http://www.bhg.com/gardening/yard/mulch/covering-ground/?socsrc=bhgpin061912

7 Perennials That Will Bloom Multiple Times This Summer

In hot regions, the Peachleaf Bellflower fares best in partial shade. Keep this in mind when looking for the perfect planting spot.

Top Plants that Thrive in Clay

It's hard to beat false sunflower for garden performance. This tough perennial blooms all summer long and boasts impressive heat- and drought-tolerance. Most varieties, such as 'Summer Sun', shown here, grow 3-5 feet tall. 'Tuscan Sun' remains under 3 feet tall, perfect for small-space gardens.

Top Plants that Thrive in Clay

Sedum 'Autumn Joy' sedum is a drought-resistant perennial flower that grows well in most soil types, even dense clay. Plant it in full sun for best results. Its late-summer blooms attract butterflies. Name: Sedum 'Autumn Joy' Zones: 3-10

One of the most reliable and longest blooming plants for the garden, cranebill geraniums add a burst of color that starts in spring and lasts until first frost. The small, cup-shaped blooms are available in blue, pink, rose and magenta. Select a site that has good drainage. Not related to the annual geranium used in planters. USDA Hardiness Zones: 5 to 9