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The opposition applies for and receives patents from U.S. Patent and Trademark Office because their GM-corn, for example, is unique and different. Yet, they’ll tell the USDA, FDA, and American consumers that their GM-corn is the exact same thing as non-GMO corn.  The only way you get a patent on something is if what you have is unique and different. So, if an ingredient is unique and different, it MUST be disclosed on a food’s packaging. Otherwise, let’s get rid of the patents.

The opposition applies for and receives patents from U.S. Patent and Trademark Office because their GM-corn, for example, is unique and different. Yet, they’ll tell the USDA, FDA, and American consumers that their GM-corn is the exact same thing as non-GMO corn. The only way you get a patent on something is if what you have is unique and different. So, if an ingredient is unique and different, it MUST be disclosed on a food’s packaging. Otherwise, let’s get rid of the patents.

According to the FDA's legal definition, a drug is anything that “diagnoses, cures, mitigates, treats, or prevents a disease.”The problem with this definition is that there are numerous substances, as readily available and benign as found on our spice racks, which have been proven by countless millennia of human experience to mitigate, prevent and in some cases cure disease, and which cannot be called drugs according to the FDA.

According to the FDA's legal definition, a drug is anything that “diagnoses, cures, mitigates, treats, or prevents a disease.”The problem with this definition is that there are numerous substances, as readily available and benign as found on our spice racks, which have been proven by countless millennia of human experience to mitigate, prevent and in some cases cure disease, and which cannot be called drugs according to the FDA.

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