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#Buddhist Art | Virūpākṣa is one of the Four Heavenly Kings representing the cardinal direction of the west in Buddhist cosmology. Japon

#Buddhist Art | Virūpākṣa is one of the Four Heavenly Kings representing the cardinal direction of the west in Buddhist cosmology. Japon

Manjuvajra Mandala, 11th century. Bangladesh or India. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Bequest of Cora Timken Burnett, 1956 (57.51.6) | This sculpture represents an esoteric form of Manjushri, the Bodhisattva of Transcendent Wisdom. #Buddhism

Manjuvajra Mandala, 11th century. Bangladesh or India. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Bequest of Cora Timken Burnett, 1956 (57.51.6) | This sculpture represents an esoteric form of Manjushri, the Bodhisattva of Transcendent Wisdom. #Buddhism

This Green Tara was painted in one of the Kumbum cambers and likely dates not long after the site was founded in 1427. The style of this image suggests that Newari artists from Nepal had a hand in imagery of this important religious structure.

This Green Tara was painted in one of the Kumbum cambers and likely dates not long after the site was founded in 1427. The style of this image suggests that Newari artists from Nepal had a hand in imagery of this important religious structure.

Stele with Eight Great Events from the Life of the Buddha Period: Pala period Date: 10th century Culture: India, Bihar, possibly from Nalanda Medium: Black schist with traces of gilding Dimensions: H. 11 1/16 in. (28.1 cm); W. 7 in. (17.8 cm); D. 3/4 in. (1.9 cm); Wt. 11 lbs (5 kg) Classification: Sculpture Credit Line: Gift of Raymond G. and Marsha Vargas Handley, 2009 Accession Number: 2009.541

Stele with Eight Great Events from the Life of the Buddha Period: Pala period Date: 10th century Culture: India, Bihar, possibly from Nalanda Medium: Black schist with traces of gilding Dimensions: H. 11 1/16 in. (28.1 cm); W. 7 in. (17.8 cm); D. 3/4 in. (1.9 cm); Wt. 11 lbs (5 kg) Classification: Sculpture Credit Line: Gift of Raymond G. and Marsha Vargas Handley, 2009 Accession Number: 2009.541

This palm leaf manuscript illustration was done in the 12th century at one of the great monastic centers in North India.  This Green Tara, shown bestowing boons, is only 2 ¼ inches tall.  It is amazing how the artist has managed to subtly depict this dynamic figure in great detail.  Such imagery went on to have a great impact on the emerging painting traditions of Tibet.

This palm leaf manuscript illustration was done in the 12th century at one of the great monastic centers in North India. This Green Tara, shown bestowing boons, is only 2 ¼ inches tall. It is amazing how the artist has managed to subtly depict this dynamic figure in great detail. Such imagery went on to have a great impact on the emerging painting traditions of Tibet.

Yamantaka, Destroyer of the God of Death, early 18th century. Tibet. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Purchase, Florance Waterbury Bequest, 1969 (69.71) | Yamantaka is a violent aspect of the Bodhisattva Manjushri, who assumes this form to vanquish Yama, the god of death.

Yamantaka, Destroyer of the God of Death, early 18th century. Tibet. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Purchase, Florance Waterbury Bequest, 1969 (69.71) | Yamantaka is a violent aspect of the Bodhisattva Manjushri, who assumes this form to vanquish Yama, the god of death.

Eleven-Headed Kannon (Ekadashamukha) : Nanbokuchô period (1336–92) 13th–14th century, Japan / Wood with lacquer and gold-leaf decoration; inlaid crystal eyes

Eleven-Headed Kannon (Ekadashamukha) : Nanbokuchô period (1336–92) 13th–14th century, Japan / Wood with lacquer and gold-leaf decoration; inlaid crystal eyes

GIFT 2003 NO PROVENANCE. Seated Bronze Buddha, 1st–mid-2nd C. CE. Pakistan, ancient Gandhara. Bronze with traces of gold leaf. Probably one of the earliest iconic representations of Shakyamuni from Gandhara. He sits in a yogic posture holding his right hand in abhayamudra (a gesture of approachability); his unusual halo has serrations that indicate radiating light. His hairstyle, the form of his robes, and the treatment of the figure reflect stylistic contacts with western traditions.

GIFT 2003 NO PROVENANCE. Seated Bronze Buddha, 1st–mid-2nd C. CE. Pakistan, ancient Gandhara. Bronze with traces of gold leaf. Probably one of the earliest iconic representations of Shakyamuni from Gandhara. He sits in a yogic posture holding his right hand in abhayamudra (a gesture of approachability); his unusual halo has serrations that indicate radiating light. His hairstyle, the form of his robes, and the treatment of the figure reflect stylistic contacts with western traditions.

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