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Appareil de Sylvester

Appareil de Sylvester

Chronographe à diapason d´après Regnault

Chronographe à diapason d´après Regnault

Fluides Mécaniques  Everything's home made.  Paris.  En quête perpétuelle d'ateliers et de modèles.

Fluides Mécaniques Everything's home made. Paris. En quête perpétuelle d'ateliers et de modèles.

Pair of Globes; Globes designed and assembled by Jean-Antoine Nollet (French, 1700 - 1770), The terrestrial map engraved by Louis Borde (French, active 1730 - 1740), and celestial map engraved by Nicolas Bailleul le jeune (French, active 1740s), et al; Paris, France; 1728 - 1730; Printed paper, papier-mâché, poplar, spruce, and alder painted with vernis Martin, and bronze; 86.DH.705; J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, California

Pair of Globes; Globes designed and assembled by Jean-Antoine Nollet (French, 1700 - 1770), The terrestrial map engraved by Louis Borde (French, active 1730 - 1740), and celestial map engraved by Nicolas Bailleul le jeune (French, active 1740s), et al; Paris, France; 1728 - 1730; Printed paper, papier-mâché, poplar, spruce, and alder painted with vernis Martin, and bronze; 86.DH.705; J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, California

A Stirling engine is a heat engine operating by cyclic compression and expansion of air or other gas, the working fluid, at different temperature levels such that there is a net conversion of heat energy to mechanical work.[1][2] Or more specifically, a closed-cycle regenerative heat engine with a permanently gaseous working fluid, where closed-cycle is defined as a thermodynamic system in which the working fluid is permanently contained within the system...

A Stirling engine is a heat engine operating by cyclic compression and expansion of air or other gas, the working fluid, at different temperature levels such that there is a net conversion of heat energy to mechanical work.[1][2] Or more specifically, a closed-cycle regenerative heat engine with a permanently gaseous working fluid, where closed-cycle is defined as a thermodynamic system in which the working fluid is permanently contained within the system...

Dip circles, also known as dip needles or inclinometers, measure slope — a.k.a. “dip angle” — with respect to gravity. Used in surveying, mining, and prospecting, dip circles also served as demonstration instruments in physics classes. The Phelps & Gurley Co. of Troy, N.Y., manufactured this brass and glass dip circle around 1848. Dartmouth purchased it in 1862 for 20 dollars.

Dip circles, also known as dip needles or inclinometers, measure slope — a.k.a. “dip angle” — with respect to gravity. Used in surveying, mining, and prospecting, dip circles also served as demonstration instruments in physics classes. The Phelps & Gurley Co. of Troy, N.Y., manufactured this brass and glass dip circle around 1848. Dartmouth purchased it in 1862 for 20 dollars.

Résultat de recherche d'images pour "instruments scientifiques musée des arts décoratifs paris"

Résultat de recherche d'images pour "instruments scientifiques musée des arts décoratifs paris"

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